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Switch to Forum Live View For a Longer Life, Put a Ring on It
2 years ago  ::  Jan 15, 2013 - 7:38PM #1
solfeggio
Posts: 9,458
A new study by medical researchers at Duke University Medical Center has found that married people are three times more likely to survive middle age than people who have never married.

link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12160...

www.newsmaxhealth.com/health_stories/mar...
 
Being happily married appears to affect a person's lifestyle because it encourages us to look after ourselves in different ways such as eating a more healthy diet and having more friends. 

The study was based on data from 4800 individuals born in the 1940s, when the study began, and who came of age in the 1960s, and who were in their late 50s when it ended. 

In general, the study found that being single increased mortality risk during middle age.

Another study, done in Sweden, showed that marriage gives protection against Alzheimer's in later life, and one from seven European countries found that married couples generally enjoyed better mental and physical heath than unmarrieds.  
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2 years ago  ::  Jan 15, 2013 - 7:47PM #2
mountain_man
Posts: 40,170

No, it just seems that way. I'm far happier now, and with a hell of a lot less stress, than when I was married.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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2 years ago  ::  Jan 15, 2013 - 8:14PM #3
solfeggio
Posts: 9,458

Well, then, different strokes for different folks.  Wink


 

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2 years ago  ::  Jan 15, 2013 - 9:09PM #4
farragut
Posts: 4,093

"No, it just seems that way. I'm far happier now, and with a hell of a lot less stress, than when I was married. "


That's entirely credible.

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2 years ago  ::  Jan 15, 2013 - 9:23PM #5
mountain_man
Posts: 40,170

Jan 15, 2013 -- 9:09PM, farragut wrote:

"No, it just seems that way. I'm far happier now, and with a hell of a lot less stress, than when I was married. "


That's entirely credible.



I'm sure my ex would agree. Cool

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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2 years ago  ::  Jan 15, 2013 - 11:07PM #6
Erey
Posts: 19,137

As far as eating goes I am unsure on that count.  I do think people influence each other's diet.  I think I read a study a few years ago that mirrors my own experience.  When a couple gets together they tend to bring each other to a kind of middle diet wise.  So if the wife is a better eater, more salads and the husband eats fast food 4 days a week then most likely what will happen is the wife will influence the husband into eating lighter food but the husband will most likely influence the wife into including a side of fries with that salad sort of thing. 


I also think this kind of thing is true when people form a close nonromantic relationship.  If you spend alot of time with a girlfriend who always orders dessert. 


I think having a significant other can provide alot of satisfaction and that is good for your health.  Also when your health takes a dive having someone there who loves you and is desparate for you to recover and continue your life as a couple you are probably more motivated to overcome. 


 


Lately I have had a small patch of women friends die in 2012 and they were all single ladies in their 40's.  It was only about 3 women but so far that is alot for me in one year. 

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2 years ago  ::  Jan 16, 2013 - 12:37AM #7
Stardove
Posts: 15,662

On my Erey.  Sorry for your losses of your young friends.  When you're my age you look back at the 40s as being young.   (((Erey)))

Beliefnet Community Wide Moderator ~ Peace Love Stardove
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2 years ago  ::  Jan 16, 2013 - 12:46AM #8
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Jan 15, 2013 -- 11:07PM, Erey wrote:


As far as eating goes I am unsure on that count.  I do think people influence each other's diet.  I think I read a study a few years ago that mirrors my own experience.  When a couple gets together they tend to bring each other to a kind of middle diet wise.  So if the wife is a better eater, more salads and the husband eats fast food 4 days a week then most likely what will happen is the wife will influence the husband into eating lighter food but the husband will most likely influence the wife into including a side of fries with that salad sort of thing. 


I also think this kind of thing is true when people form a close nonromantic relationship.  If you spend alot of time with a girlfriend who always orders dessert. 


I think having a significant other can provide alot of satisfaction and that is good for your health.  Also when your health takes a dive having someone there who loves you and is desparate for you to recover and continue your life as a couple you are probably more motivated to overcome. 


 


Lately I have had a small patch of women friends die in 2012 and they were all single ladies in their 40's.  It was only about 3 women but so far that is alot for me in one year. 




Good grief again, Erey and Solf


I married a man with values close to my own. We were college sweethearts, both at Catholic colleges nearby. His family was mainly English, mine mainly Irish, but we were raised on the same English/Irish/ American diet : dinners were meat, potatoes, veggies and often relish trays of raw veggies. Desserts were at a minimum : rare. As kids we munched on apples after school.


Fast food, even as it became available was eaten on ventures. To this day no one in our family eats fast food on a regular basis. We all cook--and I live alone and still cook.


My husband and I were married for 40 years until his death at 62, ten years ago. Our  chldren were raised as we were and with our values, which they maintain along with our dietary proclivities.


I chuckled when my grandson at MIT told me he liiked to shop at Trader Joe's for meals he makes in their dorm suite kitchen. He also makes a mean cup of coffee with Dunkin Donuts from the market : had some he made at Xmas in Charlotte. (Dunkin Donuts is a Boston fixture.)


What a totally uniique version of family life you present, really off the charts for me.


My father's sister, my godmother never married and she lived well into her seventies. She was one of my great mentors and even visited us in Bangkok on her world tour. She had been to Europe many times. She knew how to engage the world, real and intellectual and she taught me. Of couse she was truly loved by all in the family, including my children.


Some of us are truly surrounded with love and I am. I miss my daughter who died in Oct. but I am also surrounded by little gifts she brought me that remind me of her. I have a relationship with her children I cherish and with my son and younger daughter and my son's children. We are family.


I am a very liberal Catholic Christian and I do give thanks for all that has been granted to me and my family.


Jane




 

discuss catholicism
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2 years ago  ::  Jan 16, 2013 - 9:59AM #9
TemplarS
Posts: 6,924

My wife is a nurse, and I'm sure she does a much better job of managing my health care than I would do on my own.


Mostly, I don't like doctors, but she forces me to go when necessary.

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2 years ago  ::  Jan 16, 2013 - 1:26PM #10
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782

Jan 15, 2013 -- 8:14PM, solfeggio wrote:


Well, then, different strokes for different folks.  Wink


 




I've seen it from both sides -- well, all sides, really.


I grew up with parents who were miserable in their marriage, but "stayed together for the kids."


I'm still not sure how much that helped, or hurt me and my four siblings. I can say, despite not caring much for one another, my folks were still great parents to us. I made it a point to thank my dad for being such a great father (and grandfather and great-grandfather) before he passed away last year. I'll do the same for my mom when her time comes. 


In my own life, I was single for a relatively long time (until age 27) before getting married the first time.


Being in a bad marriage sucks. 


After getting divorced at age 31, I had a second long bachelorhood (with a few girlfriends here and there), before marrying again 12 years later. 


Being in a good marriage is the most awesome thing in the world. 

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