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Switch to Forum Live View What makes one a Unitarian Universalist?
3 years ago  ::  Apr 23, 2011 - 2:07PM #1
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,356
 Signing a membership book? or is it a philosophy or preference
"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 23, 2011 - 2:14PM #2
JCarlin
Posts: 6,385

Apr 23, 2011 -- 2:07PM, Jupiter6208 wrote:

 Signing a membership book? or is it a philosophy or preference


It is a discovery.

J'Carlin
If the shoe doesn't fit, don't cram your foot in it and complain.
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 23, 2011 - 2:21PM #3
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,356

I hear you it is  But can one call themselves Unitarian Universalist if they follow their views  or does signing a membership book make it official  or is there a membership  class  or do you get voted in?

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 23, 2011 - 2:52PM #4
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

How one becomes a church member varies as much as churches do, Jupiter. Each congregation develops its own procedure which must be voted into existence by the democratic process as stipulated in the church's bylaws.


To become a member of CLF, the Church of the Larger Fellowship which is by mail and online for those living too far from a church to make attendance workable, one need only express a wish to do so, determine how much you will contribute to the church during the remainder of the fiscal year and sign a pledge card stating that amount and how frequently you expect to send how much.


That's about all I needed to do when I joined my first "bricks 'n' mortar' one. A board member showed me to the stand holding the membership book and stood by as I signed it, shaking my hand and welcoming me to membership. Then, I went to the church office on Monday to give my personal info to the secretary so that I'd get the newsletter and other mailings. I signed the pledge card then, too.


The second church I joined was equally informal about it. Same basic procedure.


However, the one I attended in the St. Louis metro for a while about a year ago had a membership class that one had to complete--basic info about UUism, its history and the church's history and expectations of members. I could have applied for a waiver since I'd been a church member before but would have had to do an interview with the minister and a board member as do newcomers who've done the class. Then, I'd have been offered the membership book to sign if deemed acceptable, which process had to be witnessed with signatures by the minister and board member. Frankly, I doubt that they turn away much of anyone if anyone at all, but I do think it a good idea to make membership more of a formality than, "Oh, where is that membership book? Sure, you can sign."


Some churches in financial difficulty who have had trouble getting people to meet the amount pledged even levy an annual membership fee, usually little more than is needed to cover the dues the church must send to the UUA for each member. I have heard of churches where that was as much as $200/yr. although usually prorated somehow for a family, or they'd hardly get any but the wealthy to join.


People not meeting their pledges or not contributing a cent of what they pledged create certain difficulty for a church since budgets are planned based upon how much people say they'll give. Of course, accommodations are made for those unable to give or who are decent enough to inform the church of circumstances leaving them unable to meet their pledge.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 23, 2011 - 5:28PM #5
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,356

Do you  Currently Attend a UU Church?

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 23, 2011 - 7:05PM #6
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Apr 23, 2011 -- 5:28PM, Jupiter6208 wrote:


Do you  Currently Attend a UU Church?




No, I don't for various reasons, mostly disillusionment with the reality of UUism vs. the stated ideals.


I consider myself a classic Unitarian despite not believing in a person-like deity but think the Universalist aspect rather outdated. Few people today believe that everyone but God's elect is doomed to hell which was the impetus for the development of Universalism.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 23, 2011 - 7:36PM #7
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,356

I definitely agree with that  but me not being much of a Church goer to begin with save sometimes i go during Holidays  but over all i really don't go on a a regular basis. I have now been to a UU Church twice once last year and the second time last week  so i'm not sure what to do  if i sign the membership book  i really don't want to feel obligated to show up every week even though i felt like a UU pretty much all my life, I guess i'm  among the Classic unchurched crowd.



 

 

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 24, 2011 - 3:02AM #8
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

One problem I had despite going about every Sunday is that UU services on the whole tend to bore me silly. Those I've experienced followed a standard Prot order which is held to slavishly. As one minister told me, she'd discovered that most people want predictability. Not me, having grown up Catholic, which is why I'd hoped for variety from UU's consistent with their variability and adaptability otherwise. 


The first church I belonged to varied the format some, occasionally hosting a panel discussion on a social justice topic or having the RE kids do something different. It was in a city with a pool of nationally noted experts from which to draw, so that may have had something to do with why discussions constituted the service now and then.


The other church never EVER varied the format which became stultifying. It soon became evident that the thrill in that church was had in coffeetime conversation. A few people went to service elsewhere and only dropped in for after-service coffee and chat. One told me he found the service content at the UU church about as stimulating and inspiring as a greeting card. I soon agreed. 


To be fair, it was between ministers, not even having an interim when I started going, and didn't get an interim until about a month before I gave up on it. I know that coming up with topics was difficult for the worship committee as well as finding someone who'd moderate or give a sermon. "Why I'm So Glad I'm UU" got used more than once and became "How nice. Why should I care?"


In short, why waste an hour of my time every Sunday for a half hour or so of interesting conversation? I concluded it wasn't worth the effort. My younger sister contributes to her UU church and remains a member but only goes for a semi-weekly book discussion group, she said when I ranted to her about how boring most services are. She had the same problem.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 30, 2011 - 8:37AM #9
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,356

they have "a high opinion of humans" that don't fit with my experience. People are flawed.


But i will go a few more times and see if it works out for me,I really like them. 

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 30, 2011 - 3:04PM #10
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Apr 30, 2011 -- 8:37AM, Jupiter6208 wrote:


they have "a high opinion of humans" that don't fit with my experience. People are flawed.





UU's of my acquaintance have sometimes expressed concern that the faith doesn't acknowledge the "shadow side" of humankind adequately.


In fact, the UU church I went to most recently used "Why are UU's so afraid of our dark side?" as an adult ed discussion topic one Sunday. Very interesting discussion with one person saying at least Catholics have the confession ritual for releasing remorse and guilt over wrongdoing. UU's prefer to pretend that we're "basically good" and have no need for openly admitting to another that we've done wrong. I remember his saying that was one thing about Catholicism that he thought had real merit in terms of personal forgiveness.


Stick around UU's long enough, Jupiter, and you may encounter discussion of what some regard as a drawback to the UU "It's all good" outlook.

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