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Switch to Forum Live View Christians in UU is there room?
3 years ago  ::  Apr 12, 2011 - 11:27AM #1
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,359
I am in a interfaith marriage wife is Jewish I'm Christian (small c) like all paths  would like my 3 year old to experience a well rounded spirtual education is there room for us?
"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 12, 2011 - 9:24PM #2
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

It's been my experience that it depends upon the individual UU church.


Twenty-odd years ago, I think it was less likely in some churches for any theist to be welcomed and certainly not a UU Christian. The feeling about UU Christians, one church member of my acquaintance expressed to me, is that if they're intent upon being Christians, why would they want to be UU's anyway? I couldn't figure that out and said so, getting a look that strongly implied that I myself must not really be a UU if I thought even Christians ought to be considered full-fledged UU's.


I later concluded that people who think this likely don't understand what it means to be a Christian and a UU both. They tend to think of Christianity as requiring belief in Jesus as a deity which hasn't been the case for any UU Christian I've known.


One church of which I was a member was predominantly atheists, agnostics and secular humanists. There was almost no mention whatsoever of Christianity except for references to Christmas mythology, singing carols, and very brief references to the Christian symbolism of Easter.


Ultimately, having talked with various church members, I concluded that there was a bias against theism in general and soon thereafter decided that I would never be at home in that particular UU church.


Of course, the same can be true for non-theists in very theistically-oriented churches, I suppose.


This is why I suggest to people that they go regularly to services at a particular church for at least a full month in order to get a sense of what the church is like and of whether or not you feel comfortable there.


Which is not to say that every or even most UU churches are like this. You may well find only UU churches welcoming to all regardless of their specific beliefs which is as it should be, IMO.


I guess I've simply been unlucky.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 12, 2011 - 10:01PM #3
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,359

Thank ery much for your input i much apperciated it  well there is always the Bahai Faith. lol  i will give a UU church a month to get a feel for it and see what happens.

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 14, 2011 - 10:03PM #4
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,359

Took the Belief-o-matic  lol gotta laugh when i say that   the results do chime with what i think.


 

1.  Unitarian Universalism (100%)
2.  Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (96%)
3.  Liberal Quakers (96%)
4.  Theravada Buddhism (86%)
5.  Mahayana Buddhism (85%)
6.  New Age (82%)
7.  Reform Judaism (80%)
8.  Baha'i Faith (79%)
9.  Sikhism (79%)
10.  Jainism (78%)
11.  Neo-Pagan (74%)
12.  New Thought (69%)
13.  Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (65%)
14.  Hinduism (65%)
15.  Orthodox Quaker (64%)
16.  Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (59%)
17.  Taoism (59%)
18.  Orthodox Judaism (59%)
19.  Jehovah's Witness (56%)
20.  Secular Humanism (55%)
21.  Scientology (52%)
22.  Islam (50%)
23.  Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (48%)
24.  Seventh Day Adventist (36%)
25.  Nontheist (35%)
26.  Eastern Orthodox (26%)
27.  Roman Catholic (26%)

 

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2011 - 8:33AM #5
RevDorris
Posts: 1,805

Looks like there should be a place for you in the UU faith.

With love,

Rev Dorris
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2011 - 11:04AM #6
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,359

Indeed Rev Dorris, So how have you been? I always look forward to your postings.

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2011 - 6:27PM #7
RevDorris
Posts: 1,805

Just taking care of the family and other needs.


 


Will be doing more again soon.


Times are changing --


but then someone said I am just getting old.


I said not old but maybe a little wiser.


 


There is a place for everyone.


Maybe too -- the UU faith needs an attitude.


More wiser -- less older --


More compassionate and loving.

With love,

Rev Dorris
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2011 - 6:48PM #8
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,359

 In your opinion what changes do the UUA need to make in these Changing times and what do mean by changing times?


 


Peace & Love.

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2011 - 7:16PM #9
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

I'm not privy to the inner workings of the denomination itself, so I can't speak to what the UUA as an entity could do.


What you may not be aware of, Jupiter, is that the UUA doesn't operate as do other denominations. It is not a governing body for all churches and fellowships affiliated with it.


For instance, there are no higher clergy than ministers. While there is a denominational president and other officers, those are elected by a periodic assembly of delegates from the churches and fellowships. Each UU church or fellowship is its own entity and governs itself, independent of all others. The analogy typically given to explain this is that the UUA is like a club with churches and fellowships as members. Each church or fellowship contributes a certain amount of dues per individual member so that the UUA can provide benefits that would be difficult for an individual church to acquire and maintain, but the church or fellowship is like an individual member of a club. Hence, the Unitarian Universalist Association is the name.


The biggest challenge the denomination as a whole faces currently, IMO, is the incredible resistance most church members have to promoting their faith. I think that's largely due to the fact that the vast majority of UU's today are "come-to UU's." That is, they've been members of other churches which dissatisfied them and have become UU's. Some, of course, weren't brought up religious and have never before been church members. In the last UU church of which I was a member, there were fewer than a half dozen lifelong UU's out of a membership of 135.


Those who have been associated with other faiths are typically highly resistant to seeming to proselytize. As a result, there's often a significant bias among UU's against churches which actively promote their faith. And many UU's have never thought through how they'd explain their faith so that they seem ignorant, hesitant or uncertain when asked what UU's believe. Part of the difficulty, of course, is that UUism is non-creedal so UU's can't give a stock answer as can most Christians. And people expecting one typically aren't satisfied with the explanation that it's impossible to say what UU's believe because each person has the freedom and responsibility to determine for hirself what is most meaningful to hir individually. The usual comeback is, "So, you don't believe in anything then?" or "Do you mean you can believe whatever you want?" (in shocked tones oftentimes)


That's one major reason, I think, why membership continues to decline. That and the fact that in these increasingly unsettled times, people seem to want more certainty from their church--a definite creed and rules for behavior--and consequently gravitate to structured churches that tell them what to believe and do. UUism doesn't do either and thus won't draw very many people ever, I don't think.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 19, 2011 - 9:58AM #10
Jcarlinbn
Posts: 7,029

Not necessarily Christian but God believers are certainly welcome.  

Jcarlinbn, community moderator
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