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Switch to Forum Live View Non-Practicing Catholic Just Discovering UU.
4 years ago  ::  Oct 31, 2010 - 9:54PM #1
AMR
Posts: 1

Hi, I guess i'm kind of introducing myself.  I grew up in a non-religious family, my parents chose to send me to a catholic high school, I liked it and was baptised at 16  I followed and participated in my local catholic church for many years.


As an adult things have changed.  I guess i've become more free thinking. Anyway, I find myself disagreeing more and more with the "beliefs" of many religions.  I belief in God, I also belief an angels, saints, guardian angels, the teachings/readings of the bible, however, I don't think it should be taken literally, heaven and angels.  I can't however, bring myself to accept the concept of "confessing", and I don't like being told what I am "suppose" to belive on certain "political issues".


To me, most religions seem to be full of hyporcrites.  People saying they do/believe one way, then behaving another. Or doing something wrong, but confessing and thinking "all is good again".  It just really bothers me.  Basically, I just think people should treat each other as they would like to be treated, and stop condeming others for their "sins" and remember it's not up to us to call someone a sinner, and accept others for who they are.


Well, my hubby knows my thoughts on the matter and approached me about UU. I've done some reading, and we attended a service today, and it was nice.  Everyone was friendly. It was very laid back and I think I like it.  I like that there is a group of people that may have differing  beliefs, but overall believe that everyone is allowed that, and entitled to think freely, and treated kindly.


So, why have I never heard of this religion before.  Why does it not seem to  be more and I hate to say this, but more "popular'?

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 05, 2010 - 11:25AM #2
ayearhasgone
Posts: 11

I am a brand new UU, but I think I have some answers to your question.


There are many factors as to why UU isn't more "popular."  The biggest, I think, is UU's lack of any formal creeds.  It is very difficult to for a devout Christian to sit next to a devout atheist in the same church service.  It is much easier for that Christian to find a liberal denomination with like-minded peers.  Tolerance is hard to master-- even I have little pangs of disagreement when a pagan or an agnostic say something that I disagree with.  But I always remind myself that the mysteries of the universe are too great for us to fathom, and that perhaps the atheist, the pagan, and the Christian are all seeing different sides of the same coin.


 


 

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 06, 2010 - 7:17PM #3
RevDorris
Posts: 1,809

Welcome to the UU forum.

With love,

Rev Dorris
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4 years ago  ::  Nov 07, 2010 - 2:23PM #4
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Nov 5, 2010 -- 11:25AM, ayearhasgone wrote:


I am a brand new UU, but I think I have some answers to your question.


There are many factors as to why UU isn't more "popular."  The biggest, I think, is UU's lack of any formal creeds.



To some extent, I agree. Many people find it easier and simpler to be told what they are to believe. Forging one's own belief path is somewhat more challenging and takes a good deal more effort, more effort I suspect than most wish to expend.


More significant, IMO, is that UU's are so commonly opposed to any action that might be seen as proselytizing. Too often, that results in a lack of promotion of the faith when it would be simply an expression of satisfaction with having found such a liberal one. Thus, few people outside it know what Unitarian Universalism involves or indeed have ever heard of it.


It is very difficult to for a devout Christian to sit next to a devout atheist in the same church service.  It is much easier for that Christian to find a liberal denomination with like-minded peers.



I'm not so sure I agree with this. I rarely knew what others in my UU churches believed, or if I did, it was certainly no great exercise for me to sit next to someone with whose beliefs I disagreed. But we are all different and what was not a challenge for me could easily be one for another.


Being told to my face during a coffeetime conversation that certain beliefs which I held (likely unknown to the person expressing disdain for them) were unsuitable for a UU was much harder for me to take. I usually excused myself for more coffee or sometimes said with a smile as lightly and gently as I could manage, "And how do you know those are not my beliefs?"


Tolerance is hard to master-- even I have little pangs of disagreement when a pagan or an agnostic say something that I disagree with.



It is admirable that you are aware of your shortcomings where tolerance is concerned.


But I always remind myself that the mysteries of the universe are too great for us to fathom, and that perhaps the atheist, the pagan, and the Christian are all seeing different sides of the same coin.



A wise philosophy, IMO. I wish more people in general subscribed to this one.

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 26, 2010 - 1:10AM #5
Kimrdhbsms
Posts: 181

It is not  entirely true that UUs can "believe anything": after all, we also call ourselves a "liberal religion".  That's sortof like liberal politics.  It means we are based in love rather than fear, and acceptance rather than condemnation.  It means we aren't authoritarians.  It means we believe in social action as an expression of our spirituality.  It means we believe people are basically good rather than basically bad. 

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