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Switch to Forum Live View Hello. How did you find UU?
5 years ago  ::  Feb 13, 2010 - 6:53AM #1
Joey
Posts: 2

Hello there! I'm afraid this is just another "I'm new, just saying hello" thread. I have identified with Unitarianism for a while, but have never attended a service. I think it just speaks to me because I've always had something within me that simply *seeks* for something more, like an inherent belief in something greater than me. But many acts of "organised religion" makes me angry and upset.


How did you find your place in UU? Were you brought up within the belief, or like me, did you just need to fulfill a sense of belonging? Or something different?


Joey


 

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 13, 2010 - 11:49AM #2
Jcarlinbn
Posts: 7,102

Feb 13, 2010 -- 6:53AM, Joey wrote:

How did you find your place in UU? Were you brought up within the belief, or like me, did you just need to fulfill a sense of belonging? Or something different?


Joey 


While there are some UUs brought up in the belief, many seem to tend to "Practice independence in their religion" Most UUs discover that they are UU by straying into a church and liking what they find, or go with a friend who thinks they might enjoy the service.  I suggest finding a UU congregation or a few near you and "jumping in" one or another You may find they are quite different and different from one week to the next.  If there are no nearby congregations, you may find clf.uua.org a nice introduction.  It is an on-line church with a lending library.  But many people drive for long distances to get to the right congregation for them.  UUs are almost always good people to spend a part of Sunday with.  


 

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 15, 2010 - 5:48AM #3
Ralph.m
Posts: 159

Feb 13, 2010 -- 11:49AM, Jcarlinbn wrote:


Feb 13, 2010 -- 6:53AM, Joey wrote:

How did you find your place in UU? Were you brought up within the belief, or like me, did you just need to fulfill a sense of belonging? Or something different?


Joey 


While there are some UUs brought up in the belief, many seem to tend to "Practice independence in their religion" Most UUs discover that they are UU by straying into a church and liking what they find, or go with a friend who thinks they might enjoy the service.  I suggest finding a UU congregation or a few near you and "jumping in" one or another You may find they are quite different and different from one week to the next.  If there are no nearby congregations, you may find clf.uua.org a nice introduction.  It is an on-line church with a lending library.  But many people drive for long distances to get to the right congregation for them.  UUs are almost always good people to spend a part of Sunday with.  



I guess I'm lucky then; the local UU congregation a couple of miles from my home seems to be the only kind of a church that I could feel comfortable in, since there is no mandate that requires acceptance of supernatural beliefs.  There are a significant number of atheists and agnostics who are part of the congregation, some even in positions of leadership -- so, I don't feel like I am going to be pressured to accept things that I can't believe in. 


All of the members, whatever their metaphysical beliefs are, seem to be in general agreement on issues of social justice - which are the issues that really matter, since they determine what sort of world we leave for our children and future generations.


My advice to Joey is to attend a few services to get a first hand look. I've been attending most of the Sunday services over the last two months, and I may become a member when the next Newcomers Orientation meetings next month. It's also a good idea to read the Principles and Spiritual Topics subheadings on the UUA website  to get a better idea what it means to be a Unitarian Universalist. 


 


 

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 04, 2010 - 12:08AM #4
Sandra
Posts: 3

Hi Joey, I am new to this site too. I have been going to a UU church for 2 months now. I was raised catholic when i was young but my family stopped going to church and got outta things. So for a while i hated organized religion and thought they were very close minded as i am a scientist and the whole evolution controversy thing. Anyhow, i moved away from my family and friends and needed to fulfil the spiritual hole i had. I knew i wouldnt be able to handle a very strict church/religion due to my very open mind. I found there was a UU church (which i never heard of before) nearby and looked on their website and fell in love with the principles and freedom they give each individual. I often wish it almost had more structure and commonality with the religion. Its hard to say what you believe if you identify yourself as a UU since there are so many different beliefs within it. But, i also think that is a strength. Anyways, i just wanted to tell you that i just found it, never heard of it before and really enjoy it because i had that hole in my life needing filling. I would suggest going to a service. The one i go to is traditional (without the crazy tvs and rockbands!!) and is very poem/music oriented. They have a great respect for nature and an openness for greater energies out there. Many organized religions make me very upset and angry as well. take care.



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4 years ago  ::  Jul 24, 2010 - 11:35AM #5
Scottuu
Posts: 5

I always shared similiar feelings and beleifs.


Now that I moved, it was my aprtner that suggested we go to the Northwoods Unitarian Universalism church near us in the Woodlands Texas. We will go to our first gathering this Sunday since we choose this place..


 


 


 


 

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4 years ago  ::  Sep 14, 2010 - 12:44PM #6
Telle
Posts: 1

While going through a Pagan phase I was on an email list and noticed that some of the Pagan events were occasionally held at a local UU church.  Later, when I no longer self-identified as Pagan but was looking for a spiritual home, I remembered this and thought, "If that church allowed Pagans to hold events there, they must be really open minded."  So I started poking around online, and found uua.org.  I read up a bunch there, and found a couple of local UU churches.  Looking at their websites, I found one to have a bit of a Christian flavor to it, and that turned me off.  So, I went to the one a little farther from me.. and I loved it.  I've since moved to a different state and am slowly finding a place for me in my new UU church.

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 10, 2010 - 10:57AM #7
LiberalinLHC
Posts: 1

At least one of my co-congregationists found UU thru Belief O Matic. So I tried the test as well as the What is Your Spirituality test.   I can't find a way to get these comments to the Beliefnet Board of Director  to ask they revise W I Y S test after reading my concerns.  Anyone got any idea how to do that.


I sailed thru the Belief-O-Matic, without need to critique any question!!!!!

 

The other test option, (begins with Q2  When I think about issues of faith or spirituality......)  I was some puzzled at several terms....kept me from answering, 

 

....  Q4   Just what does the author mean by faith?  Either a personal -ology or one of the formal organized religions (Christian, Buddhist, etc) could be implied    The answers don't seem to fit if .Personal -ology  was intended

.Q8  Of human failings....would prefer author said Of human nature

 

Q11   Always suspicious of undefined use of religious and spiritual.

 

Q13    Are denominations (in the question)  synonymous with faith (used in the answers) ?

 

Q14   My basic reaction is  very selfish....When will it happen to me?   The test author did not offer such a choice in the 4 answers.  Mine would be choice 5

 

QQ17    Regarding children.   None of the above!!!    Answer 1--how does a girl practice (which means a choice) when she must submit to a removal of clitoris?   Or a boy child being circumcized?

And when parents pray 5 times a day, is not the child going to follow suit (mostly)?    The question assumes that parents are kind, intelligent, compassionate. 

 

Q19    Again, what is faith or "a faith"?  Everyone has own -ology, even those who think they are parroting what parents, priests, et al say.  Maybe that's what is called a conscience.    When the first member of my childhood congregation filed for divorce, all the talk was about possible excommunication.  I don't remember if the minister participated or if it was over-the-fence discussions only.  In any event,  answer 3, religions create barriers and hostility"  is in my opinion true,

 

Q23  Nature just "is" is my view.  So answer one seems "best"

 

Q25  I must answer "all of the above"  Prayer, is in my -ology  (credo is another word for that), sharing joys and concerns.....some people  share only with a supernatural God; some share only with fellow community members.  Can't keep joys and concerns bottled up inside!  

 

The reason some questions are missing, like #1  and #6  is the website was trying to protect its content and made it hard to print,  I fooled it into releasing most of the questions, but some just would not react to my (limited) computer skills.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 10, 2010 - 7:00PM #8
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Feb 13, 2010 -- 6:53AM, Joey wrote:

How did you find your place in UU? Were you brought up within the belief, or like me, did you just need to fulfill a sense of belonging? Or something different?


Joey



I have a rather unusual "come-to" story.


Nearly thirty years ago, I was doing some research on Ralph Waldo Emerson and the Transcendentalists to prepare to inflict them upon the hapless juniors in my high school English classes. Laughing (So, if you ever thought English teachers sadistic, damn right they are!)


While I knew a bit about Unitarianism, one article I found went into detail about what Unitarians of that time believed and then spoke of how Emerson came to differ with Unitarianism and eventually became a primary spokesperson for Transcendentalism. I kept thinking how very much I agreed with the basic precepts of Unitarianism and wondered if such a church still existed.


Of course, this was somewhat before we all had Internet access, so I backburnered my desire to find out if there were still active Unitarians somewhere "out there" in the wide world beyond the tiny Kansas town where I lived at the time. There wasn't a UU church or fellowship within 200 miles, I learned later.


A few months after that, I saw a small ad in Mother Jones magazine for the Unitarian Universalist Church of the Larger Fellowship whose website J'Carlin mentioned (www.clf.uua.org). I thought, "Hmmm...I bet this is the present-day Unitarians," and sure enough, it was.


So there's a somewhat different "how I found it" story... And if anyone in your church says they think the ads put out by the UUA every now and again aren't worth the effort and expense (which I have heard said), don't believe that for a moment. Responding to that little ad in the back pages of Mother Jones changed my life significantly.

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 12, 2010 - 10:14AM #9
ayearhasgone
Posts: 11

I was raised in a conservative, Baptist home.  In my teens I discovered Christian Universalism and was ecstatic.  I no longer had to wonder whether or not the person I was talking to was going to burn in hell for eternity for a finite number of sins.


In my later teens I abandoned Christianity because of numerous issues I had with the Bible.  I was essentially a non-religious Theist, but I longed for the support network that a church offered.


For my senior project in high school, I had to pick a handful of Christian denominations to research and discuss.  UUism was one of them.  I skimmed the Wikipedia article and was instantly hooked.

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 20, 2010 - 5:35PM #10
Brownowl33
Posts: 443

I took the Belief O Matic thing, and got "Unitarian Universalist" as my top, followed by "Pagan."  Since I was already into "alternative" religions, I started to research Unitarian Universalism and was hooked!  I can't stand most of the organized religions, with their dogma and sometimes evil behaviour, but I loved finding a place where there WAS no real dogma, and one was free to decide for one's self.

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