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Switch to Forum Live View Texas Gets Another Creationist School Board Leader
5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 4:03PM #1
dblad
Posts: 1,703

Texas Gets Another Creationist School Board Leader


US News | Sun, Jul 12, 2009 at 1:03:47 pm PDT


 Sure enough, just like clockwork, Governor Rick Perry (R-Texas) has appointed yet another activist religious fanatic to head the State Board of Education. The rumor going around was that he’d pick Cynthia Dunbar, who considers public education a “subtly deceptive tool of perversion,” but apparently that was a little much even for Perry to swallow. So instead Gail Lowe will be the woman in charge of overseeing the education of Texas children — a Republican who recently appointed extreme right-wing theocratic preacher David Barton as an “expert reviewer” of the state’s social studies curriculum.


littlegreenfootballs.com/article/34171_T...

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 4:14PM #2
dblad
Posts: 1,703
And here is a little ditty about David Barton...
David Barton
Master of myth and misinformation

 


By Rob Boston

The constitutional principle of separation of church and state has given Americans more religious freedom than any people in world history. Around the globe, those suffering under the heavy heel of government-sponsored religious oppression look to America's church-state model with longing. The "wall of separation between church and state" is America's bulwark of true religious liberty.


Despite its proven track record of success, separation of church and state is increasingly becoming just another target for the Religious Right's smear campaign strategists. In the past few years, an entire cottage industry has sprung up in Religious Right circles that seeks to "prove" that mainstream history is all wrong. The United States was really founded to be a fundamentalist Christian nation. Separation of church and state was never intended; it was, these far-right activists allege, foisted on the country by the Supreme Court in recent times.


Source: www.publiceye.org/ifas/fw/9606/barton.ht...


And another excerpt from that same article...



In 1991 Barton addressed the Rocky Mountain Bible Retreat of Pastor Pete Peters' Scriptures for America, a group that espouses the racist "Christian Identity" theology. Advocates of this bizarre dogma insist that white Anglo-Saxons are the "true" chosen people of the Bible and charge that today's Jews are usurpers. Aside from being a virulent anti-Semite, Peters has advocated the death penalty for homosexuals. According to the Anti-Defamation League, other speakers at the event included white supremacist leader and 1992 presidential candidate James "Bo" Gritz, a leader of the radical and increasingly violent militia movement, and Malcolm Ross, a Holocaust denier from Canada. In November of that same year, Barton spoke at Kingdom Covenant College in Grants Pass, Oregon, another "Christian Identity" front group with ties to Peters.4


 Wow... that's just what we need.. the RR in charge of the country. God forbid!


 


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 4:38PM #3
TPaine
Posts: 9,380

Jul 17, 2009 -- 4:03PM, dblad wrote:


Texas Gets Another Creationist School Board Leader


US News | Sun, Jul 12, 2009 at 1:03:47 pm PDT


 Sure enough, just like clockwork, Governor Rick Perry (R-Texas) has appointed yet another activist religious fanatic to head the State Board of Education. The rumor going around was that he’d pick Cynthia Dunbar, who considers public education a “subtly deceptive tool of perversion,” but apparently that was a little much even for Perry to swallow. So instead Gail Lowe will be the woman in charge of overseeing the education of Texas children — a Republican who recently appointed extreme right-wing theocratic preacher David Barton as an “expert reviewer” of the state’s social studies curriculum.


littlegreenfootballs.com/article/34171_T...




Rick Perry evidently doesn't care if Texas students learn the truth as long as they're indoctrinated in a bogus Christian version of US history. After all David Barton is not as qualified to write a Social Studies textbook as John Henry "Doc" Holliday would have been to write a medical textbook. Barton's degree is in Religious Education, not History. At least Holliday was a real dentist. I can't wait to see if Texas science textbooks say that the Earth is only 6000-years-old and either there never were dinosaurs or men kept them as pets like Fred Flintstone kept Dino. After all, why should the Republic of Texas follow US court decision such as Tammy Kitzmiller, et al. v. Dover Area School District, et al.

"The genius of the Constitution rests not in any static meaning it might have had in a world that is dead and gone, but in the adaptability of its great principles to cope with current problems and current needs." -- Justice William Brennan: Speech to the Text and Teaching Symposium at Georgetown University (October 12, 1985)
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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 5:01PM #4
dblad
Posts: 1,703

Why should anyone outside of Texas care about what is taught in its schools?


According to the reporter, John Burnett, Texas, California, and Florida buy more textbooks than any other states. Because of their comparatively large student populations and, consequently, the large number of books these states buy to "educate" their young people, these state boards in charge of textbook selection wield considerable power. Given that many smaller states follow the leads of the larger jurisdictions -- and the fact that publishers prefer to focus on books that sell well -- a handful of individuals can influence (if not determine) the ideas and principles and "facts" that teachers will attempt to instill in their innocent charges.



Source: home.earthlink.net/~rdmadden/webdocs/One...


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 5:11PM #5
dblad
Posts: 1,703

Another quote from that David Barton article...


Some might ask, "What's the harm in all of this?" After all, Americans have always been weak on their own history, and a few bad quotes here and there aren't going to make the country a theocracy. The problem is that Barton's mythology has influence that extends beyond the pews of local fundamentalist churches. He is tied in with the Religious Right's increasingly powerful political machine, a movement that currently holds the Republican Party in a headlock and enjoys the attention of Newt Gingrich, Bob Dole, Phil Gramm and other top GOP leaders. (At a Heritage Foundation speech pushing a school prayer amendment held on October 5, 1995, Gingrich, who considers himself an historian, praised Barton's books, calling them "most useful" and "wonderful.") When Rep. Ernest Istook (R-OK) held a powwow with Religious Right leaders last year to plot strategy for ramming a school prayer amendment through Congress, Barton was there. Powerful people don't view Barton as just some nut peddling phony quotes on the street corner; he is taken seriously.



I know this is old stuff... but "they" the RR and not going to, "go quietly into the night."


Tongue out


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 5:17PM #6
TPaine
Posts: 9,380

Has David Barton joined the Christian Identity Movement? If he's joining with Pastor Pete Peters it seems possible. If so he has no business being on any school book committee, although as I've said before I don't believe he belongs there anyway.


LaPorte Church of Christ is an independent church in Laporte, Colorado, led by Pastor Peter J. Peters, who proclaims that Europeans comprise the ten lost tribes of Israel and that contemporary Jews are satanic impostors, the descendants of the Biblical Esau -- the brother and nemesis of Jacob (Israel). Critics have labeled his message to be that of Christian Identity, although he rejects this label. Peters and his church are not associated with the decentralized group of churches that use the name "Churches of Christ".



en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaPorte_Church_of_...


Maybe some background on Christian Identity would be useful. They have been listed as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center,


www.splcenter.org/intel/intelreport/arti...


the Anti Defamation League,


www.adl.org/learn/ext_us/Christian_Ident...


and as a domestic terrorist organization by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.


www.cesnur.org/testi/FBI_006.htm#Anchor-...

"The genius of the Constitution rests not in any static meaning it might have had in a world that is dead and gone, but in the adaptability of its great principles to cope with current problems and current needs." -- Justice William Brennan: Speech to the Text and Teaching Symposium at Georgetown University (October 12, 1985)
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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 7:55PM #7
dblad
Posts: 1,703

 The source URL on Barton is not working... the last two letters should be ml (html), but will not paste for some reason... here is the quote concerning "Christian Identity" where he spoke a couple of times.... dblad


In 1991 Barton addressed the Rocky Mountain Bible Retreat of Pastor Pete Peters' Scriptures for America, a group that espouses the racist "Christian Identity" theology. Advocates of this bizarre dogma insist that white Anglo-Saxons are the "true" chosen people of the Bible and charge that today's Jews are usurpers. Aside from being a virulent anti-Semite, Peters has advocated the death penalty for homosexuals. According to the Anti-Defamation League, other speakers at the event included white supremacist leader and 1992 presidential candidate James "Bo" Gritz, a leader of the radical and increasingly violent militia movement, and Malcolm Ross, a Holocaust denier from Canada. In November of that same year, Barton spoke at Kingdom Covenant College in Grants Pass, Oregon, another "Christian Identity" front group with ties to Peters.4


Asked to explain these actions, Barton's reply amounted to a not very creative "I didn't know they were Nazis" dodge. In a July 1993 letter, Barton assistant Kit Marshall wrote, "At the time we were contacted by Pete Peters, we had absolutely no idea that he was 'part of the Nazi movement.' He contacted us for David to speak for Scriptures for America. The title is quite innocuous. In all the conversations that I personally had with Pete Peters, never once was there a hint that they were part of a Nazi movement. I would also like to point out that simply because David Barton gives a presentation to a group of people does not mean that he endorses all their beliefs."5 An excuse like that might have washed one time, but it stretches the bounds of credulity to accept that Barton was twice duped by innocuous-sounding extremist organizations.



I'll try to fix that URL in another post.


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 17, 2009 - 8:16PM #8
dblad
Posts: 1,703

The correct URL on the David Barton article is contained in this quote... click on the colored text.


David Barton heads the fundamentalist organization Wallbuilders, and is opposed to the separation of church and state. In 1991, he twice attended and spoke at meetings of front groups for the white supremacist "Christian Identity" movement, then claimed he was unaware he was speaking to neo-Nazis.


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5 years ago  ::  Jul 18, 2009 - 9:24AM #9
Heretic_for_Christ
Posts: 5,488

David Barton is not the issue; if not him, it would be someone else of like mind. The governor of Texas may be a true believer or he may be just a true opportunist who has staked his political future in the tried-and-true Republican tradition of jingoist demagogy.


I can only offer 2 perspectives here. The first is (apologies) something I posted on the Creationist discussion forum, on this same topic:


 


It is said that a crisis is also an opportunity. Ignorance on the march is a crisis for America, but maybe there is an opportunity here. The creationist/ID fanatics want their crap taught in the science classes. Actually, that may not be a bad thing. Consider:


Science education is not merely learning real science; it is also recognizing the difference between real science, pseudoscience, and Cloud-Cuckooland fantasy. Why not spend the first hour in the science class talking about these things? Explain the meaning of the terms "theory," "hypothesis," and "speculation or conjecture." Use evolution and creationism/ID to illustrate the point, showing that evolution is an evidence-based model that fulfills the definition of a scientific theory whereas creationism/ID not only offers no evidence but not even any prospect for ever obtaining evidence, hence it is not even a hypothesis but merely a speculation. Teach that a "theory" in science is not "just a theory," as we might use the term casually, and that creationism/ID does not fulfill the criteria for a scientific theory at all, and therefore cannot be presented as "an alternate theory." Point out that absolute proof exists only in the realm of mathematics, and that prominent gaps in knowledge exist in all the biological sciences including clinical medicine as well as evolution; yet they are real science. And show that knowledge gaps in the evolution model in no way suggest that the pure speculation that is creationism/ID has any validity at all.


These are all good things for science students to learn. Let them. Let them see what gibberish creationism/ID is by exposing it to the harsh light of critical thought, right in the science classroom, just as the Bible-besotted know-nothings demand.


 


 


The second point is that fanaticism is most effectively opposed by rational people within the group in which it arises. It appears that rational Muslims are starting to stand up to the fanatics among them -- and it is way past time for rational Christians to stand up to Christian fanatics. Fanaticism is a cancer that destroys everything, including its own home base. It cannot be bombed or legislated out of existence; it can only be muzzled and marginalized by rational people from within. Christian fundamentalist fanatics in America are far more dangerous than foreign terrorists. Foreign terrorists may plant bombs and kill people, but they cannot change the essential character of America; only Americans can do that, and American Christian fanatics are trying to do exactly that right now -- lying about American history, lying about science, trying to spread their malignant fantasies and establish a Taliban-like theocracy in this country. Rational Christians must mobilize and work collectively and relentlessly to oppose them, just as rational Muslims must organize to oppose the fanatics within their faith. There is no war between Christianity and Islam; the only real war is between rationality and fanaticism, and the fatal error is to assume that the fanatics on "our" side are not really the enemy. Yes, they are.

I prayed for deliverance from the hard world of facts and logic to the happy land where fantasy and prejudice reign. But God spake unto me, saying, "No, keep telling the truth," and to that end afflicted me with severe Trenchant Mouth. So I'm sorry for making cutting remarks, but it's the will of God.
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5 years ago  ::  Jul 18, 2009 - 4:01PM #10
dblad
Posts: 1,703

Sounds good heretic... I appoint you special emissary to the Republic of Texas. Go down to Austin and convince them they need to change their ways.


Wink


 

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