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Switch to Forum Live View What is Unitarian Univer... whatever its called >.
5 years ago  ::  Jul 11, 2009 - 1:28PM #21
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Jul 11, 2009 -- 12:02AM, Sylar wrote:

Well, if I may, it's easiest if you think of it this way. If you take the word "woman" and the word "man" you have a similarity in the two... the word "man." In the phrase, "amen" you can make the assumption that the word is speaking of both woman and man. why? Because of the word "man" (or men for this instance) is in both words (woman and man). I believe there are two different meanings in the word "man." Example, bow (to lean forward to show courtesy) and bow (like a part of a ship). These are spelled and pronounced the same, but are diffrent. I don't believe the word "man" (not the gender) acts as a representation of man (the gender) but more like a connection of woman and man.



Yes, and you're a man, so naturally you would think that way. (she says, getting obviously a bit testy.)


Your arguments in favor of "man" referring to both genders were commonly set forth in the past as being both reasonable and inclusive.


I wouldn't suggest your asking many UU women how they feel about being referred to by the general term "man." Some UU women, the more vehement feminists generally, refuse altogether to use the spellings "woman" or "women." I've seen all sorts of variations on both words as a result.


For instance, I noticed that a women's covenant group in the church I went to last Sunday calls themselves "Wyse Womyn." Cutesy, but I'm sure also used in part to avoid "woMEN."

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 11, 2009 - 6:26PM #22
Sylar
Posts: 9

... I'm sorry, I never meant any harm ma'am.

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 11, 2009 - 7:11PM #23
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Apology accepted, although I must admit that my bark is much worse than my bite on this issue.


Be forewarned, however, that you'd be ill-advised to raise these reasons why "man" and "woman" are connected during a discussion with many--perhaps any--UU women. Some will get a whole lot more upset about it than I do.


It's the rare UU church, I'm betting, where "man" would be used these days to mean both men and women. Anyone who did had better be ready for a fight or at the very least a somewhat heated discussion.

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 11, 2009 - 10:15PM #24
Sylar
Posts: 9

To be honest, I have no intention of speaking to anyone in person of the issues of UU. I was mearly interested in knowing what UU was (in which I found out many many repies ago). The only reason why I continue to reply is because so many people are nice enough to reply to my interest in knowledge of their ways. My personal opinions have never (and will never) travel any farther than these posts and my mind. I personally request everyone who replies to my post to act in a reasonable manner and to keep in mind that my search for knowledge is seperate from my emotions and hope everyone else can do the same.


I am very pleased with the replies that I have received from each and every one of you. I have aquired much interesting facts that puts my mind at ease. If anyone as anything else to add then I will continue to listen and learn.


                                                               Thank you very much,


                                                                                                 Jeremy Sylar

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 12, 2009 - 5:27PM #25
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

I didn't intend to offend but rather to give you an indication of the attitudes you'd likely encounter in a UU church. Perhaps that was too much information?


You did seem to be expressing an interest in what UUism and UU's are like. Now, you have a better idea of how very outspoken we can be.


We generally get inquiries from people who are thinking of attending a UU church and thus tend to inform on that assumption.


Again, sorry if I gave too much information, but obviously I had no way of knowing until you said so just now how much information was enough.

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 12, 2009 - 9:51PM #26
Sylar
Posts: 9

I must thank you for the apology. Most ppl of all religions and ideas (like you had told me the UU were) are outspoken about what they beleive in. This is common.

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5 years ago  ::  Aug 24, 2009 - 6:03PM #27
Raven.beliefnet.com
Posts: 50

Unitarian Universalism is the religion of the Shepherd Girl Ariel Merlin, into whom separated UUism from all of Christianity.  Of course, we regard her as the Guardian Angel, into whom kept us safe when the world lost God (i.e. when He died) on Halloween.  Such was a sad time, yet I have given Unitarian Universalism the Sabbians, the Holy Month of Yule, the Breton calendar and the Breton language.  Simply put, here are the months of the Breton calendar and their Gregorian equivalents:

  • Danu (April)
  • May (May)
  • Falco (June)
  • Ulster (July)
  • Lenon (August)
  • Enna (September)
  • Samhein (October)
  • Helsing (November)
  • Yule (December)
  • Aragont (January)
  • Imbolc (February)
  • Beowulf (March)

Here are the Unitarian Universalist holidays:

  • Candlemas (Feb. 2)
  • Beltaine (May 1)
  • Lammas (Aug. 31)
  • Halloween (Oct. 31)
  • April Fools (April 1)

God was dead during the 1960's, especially when there was so much political turmoil.  He was resurrected during the 1980's, the time into which I have contributed the works of the faith that I have described.  Ariel Merlin provided the Psalms and the Proverbs, both being Unitarian Universalist scriptures derived straight from the Bible.


If you are willing to be a Unitarian Universalist, feel free to join a congregation or fellowship.


Thank you, and may you be blessed.

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5 years ago  ::  Oct 24, 2009 - 11:56PM #28
Lonelydisciple
Posts: 155

I left the UU's after I discovered that this liberal, tolerant denomination was actually only liberal and tolerant towards those who think like they think - and I'm about as liberal as they come.  Something about that always bothered me, because it felt unfair.  I also rarely heard the word God at church.  It was sort of a bad word, or at least one to avoid, and everyone pretty much felt the same way, unless you were talking about a God or prophet from any other culture outside of Western culture.  Buddha, Krishna, Allah, Mohammed, Native American Spirits, Goddesses, etc., were all quite acceptable.  Consequently I never actually found what the real meaning of God was while I was a UU, having come in as an Atheist.   I knew nothing about Jesus because I was so innately biased against Christianity (as so many are), but after a prominent member of my church tried to convince me that Jesus was only a myth, it piqued my interest. I began to do some exploration on my own and eventually found out that the real Jesus actually walked the earth, died to bring peace and love to the planet, and could hands-down out-liberalize anyone.  Unfortunately his message got corrupted big time, but I do belive that he came to save the entire world from the unfortunate divisive consequences of religious systems.   It's sad that both the fundamentalist left and the fundamentalist right think that each has the only Truth and the two will not listen to one another because each is as intolerant as the other. 

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5 years ago  ::  Oct 26, 2009 - 1:28PM #29
jamlawken
Posts: 75

Oct 24, 2009 -- 11:56PM, Lonelydisciple wrote:


I left the UU's after I discovered that this liberal, tolerant denomination was actually only liberal and tolerant towards those who think like they think - and I'm about as liberal as they come.  Something about that always bothered me, because it felt unfair.  I also rarely heard the word God at church.  It was sort of a bad word, or at least one to avoid, and everyone pretty much felt the same way... the real Jesus actually walked the earth...Unfortunately his message got corrupted big time... 





Exactly why I left UU after 18 years.  When I was a UU my favorite Unitarian teaching was Rev. Theodore Parker's sermon "The Transient and Permanent in Christianity" deliverd in May 1841 (link attached).  This sermon always inspired me to follow the teachings of Jesus and not the teachings of the church that professes to know what is "permanent" in christianity.  Rev. Parker was a Unitarian minister and I tried for years to get my former UU congregation to abide by his teachings.  To no avail so I went elsewhere.


www.wbuued.org/Parker_-_Transient_and_Pe...

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5 years ago  ::  Oct 27, 2009 - 3:42PM #30
Jcarlinbn
Posts: 7,037

Oct 24, 2009 -- 11:56PM, Lonelydisciple wrote:

I left the UU's after I discovered that this liberal, tolerant denomination was actually only liberal and tolerant towards those who think like they think - and I'm about as liberal as they come.  



In many years in UU churches and out "Building my own Faith" I have found that frequently the liberal, tolerant congregations are not immune to the us vs them bigotry of the fundamentalists.  They probably (correctly) feel they are a minuscule minority an feel they must hunker down.  My favorite UU commentary came from Tom Lehrer:

I know that there are people who do not love their fellow man, and I hate people like that



 When I first heard that I said to myself I know UU's like that, I know whole UU Churches like that.  


I don't hold it against them. One of the main reasons for joining a group is for support against the big bad world out there, and intolerance comes with the territory.  I have to admit that tolerance as the focus for the in group is a lot better than many other choices, saved vs. damned, chosen vs infidel, but tolerance for the intolerant is not necessarily part of the package.  

Jcarlinbn, community moderator
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