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Switch to Forum Live View What is Unitarian Univer... whatever its called >.
5 years ago  ::  Jul 09, 2009 - 12:37AM #1
Sylar
Posts: 9

I'm sorry for being so blunt... but I'm really curious to know what this religion is all about. I could look it up on wikipedia, but I figured "why not hear it from the guys who believe."^.^ Thanx

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 09, 2009 - 12:40AM #2
Siribi
Posts: 205

hint: it's not a religion. Look it up, would do you good to get it from a good source rather than from hearsay.

"We're all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." Oscar Wilde
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5 years ago  ::  Jul 09, 2009 - 9:13AM #3
Sylar
Posts: 9

oops @_@ sorry for the misunderstanding. I guess I just wanted to hear it frim the horses mouth (figurativly speaking that is). Oh well, thank you, and again sorry for calling it somthing its not (stupid on my part).

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 09, 2009 - 4:00PM #4
KittyMcConkie
Posts: 31

My opinion of the message of the prior post is that it is not accurate for me.  Evidently, that is the opinion of that person.


My living of this religion is the basic core of my life.  Unitarian Universalists have different views of religion.  They define themselves as agnostics, atheists, Buddhists, Christians, Pagans, etc.  We have about 30 members of the 250 in our congregation, who came from the Jewish faith.  We believe that we can all live and accept each other even though our beliefs may differ.  We believe every person is worthy & has dignity.  If you go to this website, uua.org, (Unitarian Universalist Ass'n. of Congregations) you will be able to access much information about UUism.


If there is a UU congregation near you, perhaps you might want to visit.  For some people it takes several visits to (perhaps 4 to 6, or more) to determine if this is a congregation they want to join.  Most UU congregations have many pamphlets to acquaint visitors with our religion.  The fastest way, of course, is to go to the website. 


Our church is very active in social justice issues.  Our top priority is to help, & hopefully, end homelessness.  We have a 'green" committee & those members are active in environmental issues.  With other churches, we cook meals for two shelters, one twice a month & monthly for another.  We have many other committees that members can join.


I could write pages & pages, but, I believe you will find your journey more exciting if you pursue your spiritual quest.


Welcome to this community.  Kitty


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 09, 2009 - 4:53PM #5
Jcarlinbn
Posts: 7,100

Jul 9, 2009 -- 12:40AM, Siribi wrote:


hint: it's not a religion. 


 


I remind you that this is a community thread not a debate thread.  If you have issues with UU as a religion you may take them up on the discuss UU thread.  If you wish to discuss UU from a non religious point of view you may do so if, and only if, you have some respectful input.  


jcarlinbn


Community host.  


 


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 09, 2009 - 5:14PM #6
Jcarlinbn
Posts: 7,100

Jul 9, 2009 -- 12:37AM, Sylar wrote:


I'm really curious to know what this religion is all about. 


   


 UU is a non-credal religion for people that enjoy a spiritual and reverent space in the week to center themselves and meet with like minded people for that reason.  One is not required to believe in any particular religious idea, but generally is expected to be open to the religious expressions of others.  Many former Christians and Jews find a UU church to be a place where they can recreate some of the useful rituals and teachings without the necessity of belief in obsolete theology.  As Kitty noted the traditional social action activities associated with church groups can usually be found at a UU church, as well as the community and child welfare activities that are associated with churches.  Many people with children find that the UU Religious Education program with its emphasis on understanding religions of the world and US, and on producing morally and ethically competent youth is a reason in itself for associating with a UU church.  The community and worship for the adults is a serendipitous joy.   


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 09, 2009 - 7:05PM #7
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Jul 9, 2009 -- 4:00PM, KittyMcConkie wrote:

My living of this religion is the basic core of my life.



While I'm not currently a UU church member, I would have to agree that the basics of UUism are nevertheless my own.


For me, it's important to add that my spirituality is my personal responsibility as a UU. I like that I have the freedom to develop my own beliefs and to live them. I don't have to pretend to believe things that make no sense, that everyone knows can't possibly be true but that people are nevertheless coerced into claiming "on faith." I'm fond of saying, "Faith is when you claim to believe things you know aren't true."


I'm much more involved in my spiritual growth as a UU than I ever was in a creedal faith where I only had to maintain the pretense of believing things I knew were impossible. Now, I study various beliefs and then decide which make sense to me. Those are what I uphold.


It's alternately a very freeing and rather scary religion to have, because I feel far more responsible to behave kindly and graciously toward others as a UU than I ever did when I could simply say, "Gee, God, so sorry. Please forgive." As a UU, I have no scapegoat and must make amends as best I can (if possible) when I behave badly, as well as resolving not to do whatever it was again.

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 09, 2009 - 8:36PM #8
Sylar
Posts: 9

Wow, that sounds pretty cool (poor statement for lack of better words). I believe I understand what it's about now... I believe its a grand idea. I really appreciate you guys helping to explain this to me. To be honest, I believe in what "man" has done, what "man" is doing, and what "man" is capable of doing (doesn't mean I like what they do). But I also have faith that people know what they believe, and I respect that highly. I have an passion for attaining knowledge and thats why I thank you guys so very much. Hope you all have a great weekend to come.

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 09, 2009 - 10:40PM #9
Jcarlinbn
Posts: 7,100

Jul 9, 2009 -- 8:36PM, Sylar wrote:


To be honest, I believe in what "man" has done, what "man" is doing, and what "man" is capable of doing (doesn't mean I like what they do). 



If you are planning to check out a UU society any time soon, you should be aware that “man” is one of the six words you can’t say in front of girls.  “Girl” is another one.    

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 10, 2009 - 5:04AM #10
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

Ah, yes...what J'Carlin said above about the "Six Words You Can't Say Around UU's" is definitely the case. I generally use either "people" or "humankind" rather than the older usage "man."


Sometimes, I think using non-specific language goes too far, though. Some of the re-wording of historic hymns is either insipid or just plain sounds weird. Makes more sense to me to balance an old hymn with gender-specific language with newer ones during a service.


The intent is worthy. The execution falls short oftentimes, IMO.

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