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Switch to Forum Live View "Hua Hu Ching: The Unknown Teachings of Lao Tzu"
9 years ago  ::  Nov 18, 2008 - 12:38PM #1
Bearsky
Posts: 340
Any thoughts on this collection of oral Taoist teachings translated into English by Brian Walsker?  Thanks, Dennis
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9 years ago  ::  Nov 18, 2008 - 1:47PM #2
MengTzu
Posts: 110
[QUOTE=Bearsky;904037]Any thoughts on this collection of oral Taoist teachings translated into English by Brian Walsker?  Thanks, Dennis[/QUOTE]

I don't know if the translation is a translation of the actual Hua Hu Jing.  The following is some information about the Hua Hu Jing:

The Hua Hu Jing was an extremely polemical work that was most likely not taught by Lao Tzu.  It was instead probably written by a Tianshi adherent named Wang Fu Mei, who was engaged in heated debates with a Buddhist monk.  The work basically states that after Lao Tzu left western China, he went to India and became the Buddha (or a Buddha?)  The work has been the center of many Buddhist and Daoist controversies, and copies of it were burned more than once when the Buddhists prevailed in the controversies and the state supported them.  The work was not a part of the Zhengtong Daozang -- a Daozang is a Daoist "canon," which is more like a compilation of all Daoist texts -- since all of its copies were destroyed during one of the book burning incidents.  The work was later rediscovered, but I don't think the Daoists ever put it back into the Daozang.  I personally think it's a good idea to keep it outside of the Daozang, since there is no reason to instigate any conflict with another religion.  Besides episodes of rivalry, Buddhism and Daoism have borrowed from each other and often co-existed on friendly terms.
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9 years ago  ::  Nov 18, 2008 - 3:10PM #3
MengTzu
Posts: 110
P.S.: I just checked: while the Hua Hu Jing was not in the Zhengtong Daozang, it is included in the recently compiled Zhonghua Daozang.  One thing to keep in mind though, is that a Daozang is not really a canon -- it is a compilation or anthology.  It serves as a sort of encyclopedia for all Daoist materials.  The newly compiled Zhonghua Daozang appeared in particular to promote an academic purpose, so I can understand why they included the Hua Hu Jing for the sake of completion.  While the story might still be accepted by some practitioners of Chinese folkish religion, no sophisticated Daoist I know would accept its claims or use it to challenge Buddhism.
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9 years ago  ::  Nov 19, 2008 - 8:20PM #4
Bearsky
Posts: 340
Regarless of their origin they would seem to offer clear cut advice on how to live in harmony with the Tao instead of how to admire it as a philosophical concept.  The advice is clearly parallel to many of the lessons left to us by the Chinese Chan Buddhist masters.  Does anyone here try to live this as a path rather than study it as an academic interest?  Thanks, Dennis
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7 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2011 - 9:04PM #5
Eisenhans
Posts: 54

Nov 18, 2008 -- 12:38PM, Bearsky wrote:

Any thoughts on this collection of oral Taoist teachings translated into English by Brian Walsker?  Thanks, Dennis



Yep, I used to have that little book, long ago.


Honestly, it's total BS.


Eisenhans

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7 years ago  ::  Apr 20, 2011 - 9:12PM #6
Eisenhans
Posts: 54

Nov 19, 2008 -- 8:20PM, Bearsky wrote:

Regarless of their origin they would seem to offer clear cut advice on how to live in harmony with the Tao instead of how to admire it as a philosophical concept.  The advice is clearly parallel to many of the lessons left to us by the Chinese Chan Buddhist masters.  Does anyone here try to live this as a path rather than study it as an academic interest?  Thanks, Dennis



Dennis,


I used to live the Hua Hu Ching down to the letter; in fact, it was once my favorite book.  I read from it every night by my bed (one of my only possessions).  I was poor, passive, and had no healthy notion of boundaries. 


During this time, I took care of stray animals, nursing them back to health.  That was the only truly satisfying part of such a life.  The rest was so awful that I shudder again and again when I think of it.  They were dark days indeed, young one.... so dark, like a nightmare that haunts me still in broad daylight............


If you want to take care of stray animals, there is no need to go new-age. 


Going new-age is like throwing your life away.  I do not exaggerate when I call this a form of suicide.


Eisenhans

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