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6 years ago  ::  Sep 08, 2008 - 1:22PM #1
KittyMcConkie
Posts: 31
UUworldweekly@uua.org has a great article by Debra Haffner titled, "How to Raise a Mensch", Life: Cultivating your child's ethical and spiritual growth.  It touched my heart . 

As described in the article, "Mensch" is  a Yiddish word that literally means a human being.  The author lists what parents can do:  Listen to your children, Learn from your children, Establish family rituals, Celebrate traditions in community, Involve your children in community service.

The article is taken from Debra Haffner's book:  "What Every 21st Century Parent  Needs to Know".

I hope this is helpful for those parents who had questions about religious education in their congregations.

Kitty
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6 years ago  ::  Sep 08, 2008 - 10:57PM #2
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

KittyMcConkie wrote:

As described in the article, "Mensch" is a Yiddish word that literally means a human being.



Well, yes, it does literally. However, the word is commonly understood to mean far more than that.

I think the Merriam-Webster Online definition comes closer, "A person of integrity and honor."

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6 years ago  ::  Sep 09, 2008 - 8:16AM #3
KittyMcConkie
Posts: 31
Yes, your comments are right on.  Haffner quotes Leo Rosten later in that article.  Rosten notes that it is a "person of strong moral character" and, "someone to admire, emulate, someone with noble character", it "is nothing less than character:  rectitude, dignity, a sense of what is right, responsible". 

I probably should read Rosten since I have two Jewish grandchildren, one has been married a year -- to a Catholic.  Perhaps they could use that book in a mixed marriage.  Hm-m-m.
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6 years ago  ::  Sep 09, 2008 - 8:16AM #4
KittyMcConkie
Posts: 31
Yes, your comments are right on.  Haffner quotes Leo Rosten later in that article.  Rosten notes that it is a "person of strong moral character" and, "someone to admire, emulate, someone with noble character", it "is nothing less than character:  rectitude, dignity, a sense of what is right, responsible". 

I probably should read Rosten since I have two Jewish grandchildren, one has been married a year -- to a Catholic.  Perhaps they could use that book in a mixed marriage.  Hm-m-m.
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