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Switch to Forum Live View What is the Vinyard Movement?
7 years ago  ::  Oct 14, 2007 - 3:38PM #1
Phantasm
Posts: 767
I'm not familiar with the denomination.  I've never heard of it before.  How old is it?  What exactly are your beliefs?  I'm just looking for some general information.  Thanks in advance.  :)
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7 years ago  ::  Oct 14, 2007 - 4:01PM #2
Phantasm
Posts: 767
Thanks, DAH.  You really get around.  They seem pretty much like most of the mainlines.
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7 years ago  ::  Oct 15, 2007 - 12:56PM #3
Phantasm
Posts: 767
Hey, your church has some good ideas.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 24, 2007 - 7:04AM #4
steve123
Posts: 610
From Vineyardusa.org:

History:

The Association of Vineyard Churches is one of the fastest growing church-planting movements in the world. The Vineyard story is about ordinary people who worship and serve an extraordinary God. The Vineyard is simply one thread in the rich tapestry of the historic and global Church of Jesus Christ. But it is a thread of God’s weaving.

From the beginning, Vineyard pastors and leaders have sought to hold in tension the biblical doctrines of the Christian faith with an ardent pursuit of the present day work of the Spirit of God. Maintaining that balance is never easy in the midst of rapid growth and renewal.

John Wimber was a founding leader of the Vineyard. His influence profoundly shaped the theology and practice of Vineyard churches from their earliest days until his death in November 1997. When John was conscripted by God he was, in the words of Christianity Today, a "beer-guzzling, drug-abusing pop musician, who was converted at the age of 29 while chain-smoking his way through a Quaker-led Bible study" (Christianity Today, editorial, Feb. 9 1998).

In John's first decade as a Christian he led hundreds of people to Christ. By 1970 he was leading 11 Bible studies that involved more than 500 people. Under God’s grace, John became so fruitful as an evangelical pastor he was asked to lead the Charles E. Fuller Institute of Evangelism and Church Growth. He also later became an adjunct instructor at Fuller Theological Seminary where his classes set attendance records. In 1977, John reentered pastoral ministry to plant Calvary Chapel of Yorba.

Throughout this time, John’s conservative evangelical paradigm for understanding the ministry of the church began to grow. George Eldon Ladd’s theological writings on the kingdom of God convinced John intellectually that the all the biblical gifts of the Holy Spirit should be active in the church. Encounters with Fuller missiologists Donald McGavaran and C. Peter Wagner and seasoned missionaries and international students gave him credible evidence for combining evangelism with healing and prophecy. As he became more convinced of God's desire to be active in the world through all the biblical gifts of the Spirit, John began to teach and train his church to imitate Jesus’ full-orbed kingdom ministry. He began to ‘do the stuff’ of the Bible that he had formerly only read about.

As John and his congregation sought God in intimate worship they experienced empowerment by the Holy Spirit, significant renewal in the gifts and conversion growth. It became clear that the church’s emphasis on the experience of the Holy Spirit was not shared by some leaders in the Calvary Chapel movement. In 1982, John's church left Calvary Chapel and joined a small group of Vineyard churches. Vineyard was a name chosen by Kenn Gulliksen, a prolific church planter affiliated with Calvary Chapel, for a church he planted in Los Angeles in 1974. Pastors and leaders from the handful of Vineyard churches began looking to John for direction. And the Vineyard movement was born.

Twenty-five years later, there are more than 1,500 Vineyard churches worldwide, an international church planting movement, a publishing house and a music production company. Vineyard worship songs have helped thousands of churches experience intimacy with God. Many churches have been equipped to continue Jesus' ministry of proclaiming the kingdom, healing the sick, casting out demons and training disciples.

The Vineyard's journey has not been a straight path. It winds through many trials and triumphs. If interested in more, we recommend Bill Jackson's book, "The Quest for the Radical Middle." This readable history explores the events, issues and people who shaped the Vineyard in its first two decades.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 24, 2007 - 7:07AM #5
steve123
Posts: 610
From the founder:

"The Vineyard Genetic Code
At a Vineyard pastors conference in September, 1992, founder John Wimber
taught on 10 areas of ministry that were essential to any Vineyard church. John
called these areas the Vineyard Genetic Code because they are the common
denominators that identify us as a family. A Vineyard experience typically
includes:
Clear, accurate, Biblical teaching
Contemporary worship in the freedom of the Holy Spirit
The gifts of the Holy Spirit in operation
An active small group ministry
Ministry to the poor, widows, orphans and those who are broken
Physical healing with emphasis on signs and wonders as seen in the
book of Acts
A commitment to missions - church planting at home and world
missions abroad
Unity within the whole body of Christ; a relationship with other local
churches
Evangelistic outreach
Equipping the saints in areas such as discipleship, ministry, serving,
giving, finances, family, etc."
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 08, 2007 - 9:07PM #6
Mlyons619
Posts: 16,206
What Vineyard churchs are in the Las Vegas area?

Now THERE'S a place where the Vineyard needs to be planted...
"No freedom without education"
            --Thomas Jefferson

"NOBODY expects the Spanish Inquisition"
            -- Monty Python
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6 years ago  ::  Jan 12, 2008 - 2:47PM #7
pio_child
Posts: 43
[COLOR="DarkRed"]I have, in the past, attended a Vineyard church. It was a nice and inspiring experience. Coming from a liturgical background (Roman Catholic, Episcopal) I missed some of the deeper spiritual things. I really appreciated the service attitude (helping the poor and single mom's). I also enjoyed the worship music. I missed the deep respect for communion. The sermon seemed to be geared toward the seeker. So for me it was church lite.[/COLOR]
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6 years ago  ::  Jan 12, 2008 - 2:47PM #8
pio_child
Posts: 43
[COLOR="DarkRed"]I have, in the past, attended a Vineyard church. It was a nice and inspiring experience. Coming from a liturgical background (Roman Catholic, Episcopal) I missed some of the deeper spiritual things. I really appreciated the service attitude (helping the poor and single mom's). I also enjoyed the worship music. I missed the deep respect for communion. The sermon seemed to be geared toward the seeker. So for me it was church lite.[/COLOR]
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6 years ago  ::  Jan 18, 2008 - 12:19PM #9
steve123
Posts: 610
Hello, pio_child,

I, too, am a liturgical worshipper (of the Lutheran persuasion).  Like you I really appreciate the service attitude of the vineyard, as well as the worship music.  Also, like you, I come to miss the liturgy, so that's why I attend both a vineyard church and a lutheran church.  this way I get the body and blood of christ in a liturgical setting, plus the great worship experience of the vineyard.  I would say, however, that some people get the "deeper spiritual things" from a vineyard.  I guess it is all what you make of it.

God Bless.
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6 years ago  ::  Jan 18, 2008 - 7:11PM #10
pio_child
Posts: 43
[COLOR="Sienna"]Thanks Steve, we are somewhat on the same page[/COLOR]
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