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Flag Phantasm October 14, 2007 3:38 PM EDT
I'm not familiar with the denomination.  I've never heard of it before.  How old is it?  What exactly are your beliefs?  I'm just looking for some general information.  Thanks in advance.  :)
Flag DAH54 October 14, 2007 3:55 PM EDT
You might find this page helpful; What do Vineyard Churches Believe?.

We believe that there is one Living and True God, eternally existing in three persons, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, equal in power and glory; and that this triune God created all, upholds all and governs all.
We believe that the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament are the Word of God, fully inspired, without error in the original manuscripts, and the infallible rule of faith and practice.
We believe in God the Father, an infinite, personal Spirit, perfect in holiness, wisdom, power and love; that He concerns Himself mercifully in the affairs of men; that He hears and answers prayer; and that He saves from sin and death all who come to Him through Jesus Christ.
We believe in Jesus Christ, God's only begotten Son, conceived by the Holy Spirit. We believe in His virgin birth, sinless life, miracles and teaching, His substitutionary atoning death, bodily resurrection, ascension into heaven, perpetual intercession for His people and personal visible return to earth. We believe that in His first coming Jesus inaugurated the fulfillment of the Kingdom of God.
We believe in the Holy Spirit, Who came forth from the Father and Son to convict the world of sin, righteousness, and judgment, and to regenerate, sanctify and empower for ministry all who believe in Christ; we believe the Holy Spirit dwells in every believer in Jesus Christ and that He is an abiding Helper, Teacher, and Guide. We believe in the present ministry of the Holy Spirit and in the exercise of all the Biblical gifts of the Spirit.
We believe that all men are sinners by nature and choice and are therefore under condemnation; and that God regenerates and baptizes by the Holy Spirit those who repent of their sins and confess Jesus Christ as Lord.
We believe in the universal Church, the living spiritual body, of which Christ is the Head and all regenerated persons are members.
We believe that the Lord Jesus Christ committed two ordinances to the church: Baptism and the Lord's Supper. We believe in water baptism and communion open to all believers.
We believe also in the laying on of hands for the empowering of the Holy Spirit, for ordination of pastors, elders and deacons, for receiving gifts of the Spirit, and for healing.
We believe in the personal, visible appearing of Christ to each believer and the consummation of His Kingdom, in the resurrection of the body, the final judgment and eternal blessing of the righteous, and endless suffering of the wicked.
Flag Phantasm October 14, 2007 4:01 PM EDT
Thanks, DAH.  You really get around.  They seem pretty much like most of the mainlines.
Flag DAH54 October 14, 2007 4:30 PM EDT
Well I can't speak for all Vineyard churches, my local church is very much into service, they are the ones out during the summer passing out free cans of coke on the street corners. They are the ones passing out free donuts on the weekends. They have gone around to business and offered to clean their toilets. To name just a few of the many things they are involved in within our community. :)
Flag Phantasm October 15, 2007 12:56 PM EDT
Hey, your church has some good ideas.
Flag DAH54 October 15, 2007 6:49 PM EDT
On behalf of the Vineyard, Thank you.  :)  I agree I believe they have some very good ideas, and the energy to put their thoughts and beliefs into practice. I believe they attempt to live the life they preach. :)
Flag steve123 October 24, 2007 7:04 AM EDT
From Vineyardusa.org:

History:

The Association of Vineyard Churches is one of the fastest growing church-planting movements in the world. The Vineyard story is about ordinary people who worship and serve an extraordinary God. The Vineyard is simply one thread in the rich tapestry of the historic and global Church of Jesus Christ. But it is a thread of God’s weaving.

From the beginning, Vineyard pastors and leaders have sought to hold in tension the biblical doctrines of the Christian faith with an ardent pursuit of the present day work of the Spirit of God. Maintaining that balance is never easy in the midst of rapid growth and renewal.

John Wimber was a founding leader of the Vineyard. His influence profoundly shaped the theology and practice of Vineyard churches from their earliest days until his death in November 1997. When John was conscripted by God he was, in the words of Christianity Today, a "beer-guzzling, drug-abusing pop musician, who was converted at the age of 29 while chain-smoking his way through a Quaker-led Bible study" (Christianity Today, editorial, Feb. 9 1998).

In John's first decade as a Christian he led hundreds of people to Christ. By 1970 he was leading 11 Bible studies that involved more than 500 people. Under God’s grace, John became so fruitful as an evangelical pastor he was asked to lead the Charles E. Fuller Institute of Evangelism and Church Growth. He also later became an adjunct instructor at Fuller Theological Seminary where his classes set attendance records. In 1977, John reentered pastoral ministry to plant Calvary Chapel of Yorba.

Throughout this time, John’s conservative evangelical paradigm for understanding the ministry of the church began to grow. George Eldon Ladd’s theological writings on the kingdom of God convinced John intellectually that the all the biblical gifts of the Holy Spirit should be active in the church. Encounters with Fuller missiologists Donald McGavaran and C. Peter Wagner and seasoned missionaries and international students gave him credible evidence for combining evangelism with healing and prophecy. As he became more convinced of God's desire to be active in the world through all the biblical gifts of the Spirit, John began to teach and train his church to imitate Jesus’ full-orbed kingdom ministry. He began to ‘do the stuff’ of the Bible that he had formerly only read about.

As John and his congregation sought God in intimate worship they experienced empowerment by the Holy Spirit, significant renewal in the gifts and conversion growth. It became clear that the church’s emphasis on the experience of the Holy Spirit was not shared by some leaders in the Calvary Chapel movement. In 1982, John's church left Calvary Chapel and joined a small group of Vineyard churches. Vineyard was a name chosen by Kenn Gulliksen, a prolific church planter affiliated with Calvary Chapel, for a church he planted in Los Angeles in 1974. Pastors and leaders from the handful of Vineyard churches began looking to John for direction. And the Vineyard movement was born.

Twenty-five years later, there are more than 1,500 Vineyard churches worldwide, an international church planting movement, a publishing house and a music production company. Vineyard worship songs have helped thousands of churches experience intimacy with God. Many churches have been equipped to continue Jesus' ministry of proclaiming the kingdom, healing the sick, casting out demons and training disciples.

The Vineyard's journey has not been a straight path. It winds through many trials and triumphs. If interested in more, we recommend Bill Jackson's book, "The Quest for the Radical Middle." This readable history explores the events, issues and people who shaped the Vineyard in its first two decades.
Flag steve123 October 24, 2007 7:07 AM EDT
From the founder:

"The Vineyard Genetic Code
At a Vineyard pastors conference in September, 1992, founder John Wimber
taught on 10 areas of ministry that were essential to any Vineyard church. John
called these areas the Vineyard Genetic Code because they are the common
denominators that identify us as a family. A Vineyard experience typically
includes:
Clear, accurate, Biblical teaching
Contemporary worship in the freedom of the Holy Spirit
The gifts of the Holy Spirit in operation
An active small group ministry
Ministry to the poor, widows, orphans and those who are broken
Physical healing with emphasis on signs and wonders as seen in the
book of Acts
A commitment to missions - church planting at home and world
missions abroad
Unity within the whole body of Christ; a relationship with other local
churches
Evangelistic outreach
Equipping the saints in areas such as discipleship, ministry, serving,
giving, finances, family, etc."
Flag Mlyons619 November 8, 2007 9:07 PM EST
What Vineyard churchs are in the Las Vegas area?

Now THERE'S a place where the Vineyard needs to be planted...
Flag DAH54 November 8, 2007 9:59 PM EST

mlyons619 wrote:

What Vineyard churchs are in the Las Vegas area?

Now THERE'S a place where the Vineyard needs to be planted...


Well there is Legacy Vineyard 3200 Soaring Gulls, Las Vegas, NV 89129 (702) 838-9099 and there is also [SIZE=-1]Water From The Rock Christian Fellowship, 1370 Matthew Ln, Pahrump, NV. Tel: 775-751-8449. I believe.
[/SIZE]

Flag pio_child January 12, 2008 2:47 PM EST
[COLOR="DarkRed"]I have, in the past, attended a Vineyard church. It was a nice and inspiring experience. Coming from a liturgical background (Roman Catholic, Episcopal) I missed some of the deeper spiritual things. I really appreciated the service attitude (helping the poor and single mom's). I also enjoyed the worship music. I missed the deep respect for communion. The sermon seemed to be geared toward the seeker. So for me it was church lite.[/COLOR]
Flag pio_child January 12, 2008 2:47 PM EST
[COLOR="DarkRed"]I have, in the past, attended a Vineyard church. It was a nice and inspiring experience. Coming from a liturgical background (Roman Catholic, Episcopal) I missed some of the deeper spiritual things. I really appreciated the service attitude (helping the poor and single mom's). I also enjoyed the worship music. I missed the deep respect for communion. The sermon seemed to be geared toward the seeker. So for me it was church lite.[/COLOR]
Flag steve123 January 18, 2008 12:19 PM EST
Hello, pio_child,

I, too, am a liturgical worshipper (of the Lutheran persuasion).  Like you I really appreciate the service attitude of the vineyard, as well as the worship music.  Also, like you, I come to miss the liturgy, so that's why I attend both a vineyard church and a lutheran church.  this way I get the body and blood of christ in a liturgical setting, plus the great worship experience of the vineyard.  I would say, however, that some people get the "deeper spiritual things" from a vineyard.  I guess it is all what you make of it.

God Bless.
Flag pio_child January 18, 2008 7:11 PM EST
[COLOR="Sienna"]Thanks Steve, we are somewhat on the same page[/COLOR]
Flag DevoutSeeker June 19, 2008 6:07 PM EDT
So Vineyard  is basicly  the same as Pentecostal, But are there any differences in Theology and doctrine and practice?, Thanks.
Flag butterflynews11 June 20, 2008 8:34 PM EDT
[QUOTE=DevoutSeeker;574051]So Vineyard  is basicly  the same as Pentecostal, But are there any differences in Theology and doctrine and practice?, Thanks.[/QUOTE]

Hi DevoutSeeker,
Thanks for asking. Charismatics and Pentecostals have a commonality in that they both believe in the spiritual gifts of the Holy Spirit. Pertaining to the gift of tongues, specifically, most (but not all) Pentecostals of the Church of God, Holiness and Assemblies of God persuasion, emphasize tongues and believe that it is to be distributed to everyone. But Charismatics generally believe that tongues isn't distributed to everybody.
From my understanding of being surrounded by both Charismatics and Pentecostals, the prophetic gift is sought after moreso with the Charismatics. 1 Cor. 14:1 says to 'Let love be your highest goal, but also desire the special abilities the Spirit gives, especially the gift of prophecy.' (NLT) But that's not to say that tongues isn't important - it is for a lot of reasons. But according to the passage, prophecy seems to supercede tongues.

Also, the aforementioned Pentecostals usually wear formal attire and sing traditional songs with a traditional sound. Charismatics, otoh, in non-denominational and independent churches, (of which Vineyard adheres to a non-denominational standpoint), usually wear casual attire and have contemporary songs to their Worship.

Many mainline liturgical churches are also Charismatic (or Pentecostal).

The term 'Pentecostal' comes from Acts 2 when the Holy Spirit came upon the believers in power on the day of Pentecost when the Church was officially deemed to have begun.

Well, that's all I can think of at the moment.
Smallson, please make any corrections if I made any errors. Thanks.

Thanks again, and have a wonderful day!
With Love and Blessings,
Yvette
Flag smallson June 21, 2008 11:43 PM EDT
[QUOTE=DevoutSeeker;574051]So Vineyard  is basicly  the same as Pentecostal, But are there any differences in Theology and doctrine and practice?, Thanks.[/QUOTE]

Much of their doctrine is the same, with small differences.What is often very different is their style and emphasis (depending on which Pentecostal churches your comparing them to).

Yvette is correct that Pentecostals emphasize  tongues more.Pentecostals also typicaly believe in the "initial evidence of tounges" doctrine.This teaching sais that tongues is the initial evidence of being filled with the Holy Spirit (They typicaly see the infilling of the Holy Spirit as something that happens after salvation or subsequent to it, a seperate experience from that of salvation). The implication is that any Christian who doesn't receive the gift of tongues, hasn't been filled with the Holy Spirit.Vineyard churches don't teach this.They believe it is possible for a person to be filled with the Holy Spirit without receiving the gift of tongues, while accepting  tounges as a gift for the church today.This would be consistent with most Charismatics from mainline churches (eg. Baptist, Anglican, Lutheran, etc).

A few other differences:

1.Pentecostals tend to believe it is a sin to drink alcohol (eg. wine, beer, etc). Vineyard tends to believe it isn't a sin, as long as it is done in moderation.

2.Pentecostals tend to believe a Christian can't be inhabited by demons.The Vineyard seems to believe this is possible.

3.Pentecostals are much more likely to put emphasis on repentance or holiness teaching than the Vineyard, while the Vineyard is more likely to focus on the loving kindness of the Heavenly Father.

4.Pentecostals almost always refer to their pastors by their title, such as Pastor Bob or Pastor Jim. In Vineyard churches, people typicaly address their pastors by their name only.You address them simply as Bob or Jim, etc .They do not put a high value on titles.They  respect their leaders but relate to them as equals.This is probably connected to the Quakers who also reflected this attitude.

One thing both groups share is strong roots in California.

The Pentecostal movement of today was heavily influenced by the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angelas California.(Pentecostals actualy go back before this, but it had an important impact on most of it's history).This early 1900's revival was led by a black American Holiness preacher, where whites and blacks freely worshiped together without segregation (something very controversial at the time).There was also a church that goes back to the late 1800's that became known as "The Church of God In Christ". Being birthed by a black American who eventualy visited the Azusa Street Revival, this denomination would become a major part of the movement.Because of such factors, Pentecostals quite often have fiery or shout style preaching which reflects it's black American and old time Holiness roots.(The Holiness church itself was an outgrowth of the old time Methodist faith).

The Vineyard on the other hand has very white Californian roots, shaped by the more modern hippie-Jesus movement of the late 60's and 70's.Hippie's converted to Christ and worshiped God with rock music, folk and blue jeans.Calvary Chapel (a Evangelical Church that began in California) played an important part in ministering to the hippie generation, and out of this church the Vineyard was birthed.So this is why Vineyard churches tend to have a very laidback dress code in church--blue jeans, t-shirts and the like being very dominant.(Pentecostals also have alot of laidback dressers in some congregations today, but they have much stronger tendencies to dress up for church ).Another shaper of Vineyard style was probably linked to it's Quaker roots, it's most important founder--John Wimber being a former Quaker pastor (an Evangelical Quaker to be precise).Quaker churches (atleast traditionaly) have been known for silence and contemplative prayer.The Vineyard tradition also has contemplative silent prayer (sometimes) and typicaly a very low key-quiet style of preaching.Not shure how much this owes to the Quakers.It seems to me it's atleast a contibuting factor.The typicaly calm preaching style is a huge contrast to some of the Pentecostal shouting, but they sometimes make up for the difference with rocking music.
Flag smallson June 22, 2008 12:37 AM EDT
[QUOTE=butterflynews11;576932]

Well, that's all I can think of at the moment.
Smallson, please make any corrections if I made any errors. Thanks.

Yvette[/QUOTE]

You did pretty good Yvette! Probably the only thing I would tweek a bit is what you said concernig Pentecostal music and dress.

Denominational Pentecostals (eg. Assemblie of God) seem to be the most traditional of Pentecostals.Predictably they almost always have either an acoustic piano, organ or both in the congregation, along with a drum set.But Contemperary music and modern worship is actualy pretty common in Pentecostal churches these days.There's usually a certain amount of the old with the new, to varying degree's.The one I'm familiar with in town used to have alot of gospel hymn piano/organ stuf.But today it's mostly modern worship songs in a contemperary, often rock style.Lots of guitar in an overall contemperary sound, but still keeping the old piano.The one I visited in Newfoundland (earlier this month) was mostly in a more old gospel hymn/old chorus style, with a hint of country & western in the guitar work.Most of the songs were older, but even they included some more current worship songs.It varys from congregation to congregation, but I've yet to be in one of them in current days that didn't have atleast some contemperary songs or style in their repertoire (including Vineyard songs).

Having said that, they do have much stonger leanings toward traditional music than Vineyard.And they certainly are more liklier to dress up in church, though again it varies from church to church.I was one of the rare od balls in the Newfoundland church that wore blue jean and t-shirt/sweater.Virtualy all of them were dressed up in special clothes like suites and dress pants.The one I know in town also has alot of dressed up people in church, but intermingled with alot more informaly dressed.

Anyway, it's getting late and need to get some sleep.See you later!
Flag butterflynews11 June 23, 2008 5:48 PM EDT
Thanks, Smallson. As usual you're right on! And that's one of the things I really appreciate about you.. you give good, clear, accurate information.
I don't have anything to add except that it's interesting how traditional the sound is with the Churches of God and Assemblies of God (ones that I've been to) as compared to Vineyard, and yet they have worship bands made up of the basic instruments, i.e. an electric guitar, drums, organs or organ/synth keyboards - the latter being more prevalent in Charismatic circles - and the bass. The drums are usually played more low-keyed with basic beats in Pent churches, whereas churche worship bands usually have a soft rock or hard rock beat. The intimate songs can be treated with a traditional sound. A lot of the very early Vineyard slow songs could have easily been played on a general Christian radio station.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the reason for the low-keyed drumming and repetition (a holding back, if you will) in Pentecostal churches is due to the general belief by that rock music isn't beneficial to ones spiritual life. And if the drummer rocks out, they then feel that the drummer will open some doors to demonic activity.
Charismatics usually have the beliefs of opening up doors to demonic activity, as well, e.g. conducting seances.

Yeah will catch ya later,
Yvette
Flag butterflynews11 June 23, 2008 5:53 PM EDT
correction: '...whereas Charismatic church worship bands usually have a soft rock or hard rock beat.'
Flag butterflynews11 June 26, 2008 10:44 PM EDT
Greenponder, are you still with us?
Perhaps my use of the term 'pompous' wasn't the best description. Limited Atonement seems... oh goodness.. what's the word.. Anyway, it's difficult for me to comprehend how God would allow multi-millions, perhaps billions of people, who haven't heard, as well as those who are confined to mental health facilities for the rest of their lives, end up in the lake of fire. If you would, what are some Scriptural references where people are doomed if they don't believe in Jesus in the here and now? (especially with the two examples that I cited) I appreciate it, thanks.

Hope to see you again,
Love,
Yvette
Flag smallson June 27, 2008 9:31 PM EDT
[QUOTE=butterflynews11;582483]Thanks, Smallson. As usual you're right on! And that's one of the things I really appreciate about you.. you give good, clear, accurate information.
I don't have anything to add except that it's interesting how traditional the sound is with the Churches of God and Assemblies of God (ones that I've been to) as compared to Vineyard, and yet they have worship bands made up of the basic instruments, i.e. an electric guitar, drums, organs or organ/synth keyboards - the latter being more prevalent in Charismatic circles - and the bass. The drums are usually played more low-keyed with basic beats in Pent churches, whereas churche worship bands usually have a soft rock or hard rock beat. The intimate songs can be treated with a traditional sound. A lot of the very early Vineyard slow songs could have easily been played on a general Christian radio station.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the reason for the low-keyed drumming and repetition (a holding back, if you will) in Pentecostal churches is due to the general belief by that rock music isn't beneficial to ones spiritual life. And if the drummer rocks out, they then feel that the drummer will open some doors to demonic activity.
Charismatics usually have the beliefs of opening up doors to demonic activity, as well, e.g. conducting seances.

Yeah will catch ya later,
Yvette[/QUOTE]

Your words are kind Yvette.I try to give clear accuarate information, though I've messed up different times.I don't always get my information right.

I know what you mean by the low key drumming and holding back that is found in some Pentecostal churches.And I think this can have something to do with the anti-rock thing at times.Certainly in the 1980's, Jimmy Swaggert (who was Assemblies Of God) had an influence over that denomination in that line of thinking.But it only tells part of the story.I've seen both low key drummers (some who actualy like and approve of rock, but afraid to rock it out in church) and drummers who are more free.If you were to visit a variety of COGIC/Church Of God In Christ fellowships (a predominately black American denomination) I don't think you'de see alot of holding back.I'll show you some clips on the music board to demonstrate my point (so things don't go to off the original topic hear).

Have a Grape Night!
Flag Bevo July 7, 2009 3:26 PM EDT

Greetings to all Vineyardites!  After being with the Vineyard for 10 or so years, a little over a year ago I transferred back to my former Methodist church.  Why?  Because the Vineyard church went from holding to a sacramental view of the "Breaking of the Bread" (as N.T. Wright calls it) to a "Symbolism only" view.


Our church was founded by the current National Director of the Association of Vineyard churches, Bert Wagonner, and Bert very much held to a sacramental view.  But as the church grew and new pastors came on board, the church went to a symbolism only approach to the Breaking of the Bread.


In its early years, under the leadership of Bert, the church was like Methodism on steroids!  I heard Bert mentioning John Wesley's name far more often than I heard his name mentioned at my former Methodist church.  But like I said, things changed, and for me, the Breaking of the Bread is the most central act of worship in the church. 


Well, after being away for ten years, my old Methodist church has come a long way!  Our 11:00 service is very contemporary, and I haven't had to learn any new songs--I heard them all at the Vineyard.  We have a very talented Director of Music (a PhD) and he has a heart for both traditional and contemporary worship.  The worship band isn't up to most Vineyard standards, but it's not bad. 


Being a typical Methodist congregation, most folks are not very demonstrative during worship.  I sort of ease off to the side and raise my hands during worship, or kneel, etc.  Several folks have approached and thanked me for the way I worship.  Oh well...maybe I can encourage others to more engage themselves in worship.


Bert told me once the Vineyard is not a confessional movement, meaning that each Vineyard church is pretty much free to work out their own theology on issues such as the Breaking of the Bread.  That's okay.  I loved my time with the Vineyard, and on the few Sundays when for some reason the 11:00 worship is traditional, I'll ease over to the Vineyard and get my fix of worship.

Flag Mlyons619 October 1, 2009 1:52 AM EDT

Hmmm.  Sorry to hear about the changes in the Vineyard movement.


Then again, it never was the whole movement as a whole, but rather what each pastor did in his church.  If the Pastor preaches the Lord, set's the Lord's example, lives his life as the Lord would have him live it, and runs his church NOT as a place to meet on Sundays, but rather as God's home 24/7, then the Lord resides in that church, and God's people gather there. 


p.s.  At the Palos Verde Vineyard back in 96-97, the Sacrament was in no way symbolic to us.  Probably why, when we called the Holy Spirit to come fill us, our pastor would heal the sick, some of us would speak in tongues, while others would tranlate the Spirit.  Our pastor wasn't leading service, the LORD was leading...

Flag Bevo October 1, 2009 3:59 PM EDT

Like I said, and as you have also said, the Vineyard is not a confessional church when it comes to the issue of the Breaking of the Bread.  Each church may view this act of worship as either symbolism or a sacrament.


However, if the Breaking of the Bread is exempt, then how about baptsim?  What would be the church's response should a Vineyard church begin baptising infants?  I'm assuming it would object.  But if it objects to different practices concerning baptism, then how can it not object to different practices concerning the Breaking of the Bread?


The Vineyard allows for women pastors, determined by the decision of each individual Vineyard church.  Again, on this issue it is a non-confessional movement.  I'm only trying to determine under what circumstances the Vineyard church does become a confessional movement, and what criteria it uses in dertermining what issues are and what issues are not applicable.

Flag Theo February 23, 2011 12:56 AM EST

I attended a Vineyard Church about 12 years ago - while looking for a Charismatic Liturgical Church. When I found that, I stopped attending the Vineyard. I enjoyed the Vineyard I went to, really like the worship convensions. But was always very disappointed in the way they observed the Lord's Supper. After a while, I only attended for the worship, then went out to my car for a nap or to listen to pastor Chuch Smith on CIS radio. The pastor bored me, I only stayed because my son liked it there - at least until I found a good liturgical Church.


~ Theophilus

Flag steve123 March 1, 2011 10:59 AM EST

The vineyard I attend on Saturday nights is awesome - Rich nathan at the columbus vineyard in ohio is fantastic.


 


I agree, theo, that if you like a formal liturgy, vineyard services wouldn't be for you.  For me, I get my liturgical fix on Sunday morning at a lutheran church and the saturday night services get me fantastic preaching in Rich Nathan.

Flag Theraptureissoonerthenwethink1 August 19, 2011 7:59 PM EDT

I go to a Calvary Chapel church so I stay a way with the Vineyard Movement because of many reasons, with all due respect.

Flag steve123 September 7, 2011 2:03 PM EDT

I go to Vineyard Church, so with all due respect I stay away from the Calvary Chapel church.

Flag Theo September 25, 2011 4:18 PM EDT

The sad thing about the last two posts is that Calvary Chapel and the Vineyard were once basically the same thing. The founder of the Vineyard movement (John Wimber) was once affiliated with pastor Chuck Smith - the founder of the Calvary Chapel movement. Sad thing was, Chuck and John had a falling out over issues dealing with the gifts and manifestations of the Spirit... Chuck and his churches went more toward the non-charismatic side of Evangelicalism, and John and his churches went full tilt into the Chrismatic/Pentecostal side of Evangelicalism. 


Personally, I really liked the only big Calvary Chapel I've attended (Olympia WA) and I didn't much like either of the Vineyard Churches I've attended. I have attended or visited a few small Calvary Chapels... and I did not like them at all. But having said that... its nothing but personal opinion and prefferences. Frankly I am much more interested in following the Bible these days... which is why I much prefer liturgical Churches... the kind that actually read from the Bible as part of their worship services and celebrate the death and resurrection of Christ in the offering of the Eucharist. I am tired of churches that offer the Sunday Sermon as the main focus of worship, or offering feeling after God like Quakers as the main focus of their worship services. I believe that when we come together as a Church, we should come to worship and honor God... not all the other stuff Evangelicals are want to do with their Sundays.


~ Theophilus

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