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    Faithful ?

    Friday, June 6, 2014, 5:33 PM [General]

    Only those who want to be condemned actually condemned?

    No one really wants to be condemned. But some choose to be condemned because their sinful actions exclude them from the life of blessedness. In the same way, no one really wants to spend their lives on earth full of hatred and wishing evil on one’s neighbor, but some choose to live this way, much to their own suffering. Consciously choosing evil through a life of mortal sin and stubbornly persevering in sin until death will result in one’s condemnation. God certainly does not want anyone to be condemned; He loves us and sent Jesus so that “whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life” (Jn 3:16). But believing in Jesus requires us to be faithful to His will. As Our Lord told His disciples, “If you love me, you will keep my commandments” (Jn 14:15).

     



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    Graces operate in our lives...

    Friday, June 6, 2014, 11:06 AM [General]

    Cooperating with the graces of Pentecost

    On Pentecost day, God’s mercy and love came in the form of a powerful wind and in the shape of tongues of fire, and hovered over the heads of his apostles, filling them with unending joy and the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Who is this Holy Spirit? The Advocate, the Consoler, the Enlightener, the Gift and Virtue Giver, the Father of the Poor, the third Person of the Most Holy Trinity.

    In the life of a Christian, every day is a Pentecost. We have been baptized in water and the Holy Spirit. At our Confirmation, the fire of the Holy Spirit acted on each of us in an invisible way. Every day the mighty Wind comes, if only we call upon him. Every day the tongues of flame descend upon us, if we realize our need for them and desire them with a great desire. In each one of us, at all times, the Fire and the Wind are with us, but we tend to forget this as we grow older. We let things ride. Let us lift our hearts and minds and remember that the breath of the Spirit and his fire are upon us.

    God has sent this fire to renew the earth, and this fire does not only come at a certain moment in time. It comes every moment, at all times, so that we can give to others the gifts that we have received. Do we allow ourselves to be caught up in that Wind that makes all things new, that renews the face of the earth? Or are we like ostriches hiding our heads in the sand of old habits, old ways? Stubbornly refusing to be caught by the Wind of the Spirit that tries to sweep us clean so that we show beauty to the world once more?

    It is so easy to hide from the Wind. It is easy to let it pass by without allowing ourselves to be caught up by it. It is easy to stay put, behind closed doors and windows, pleading that winds are drafty, that they may sweep corners of our souls that we have not looked at for many years. It is so easy to plead that we are too set in our ways, too tired to allow ourselves to be “spring-cleaned” by the Wind of the Holy Spirit.

    For the fresh air that the Wind brings demands of us tremendous efforts; it pleads for a re-examination of mind, soul, and heart that frightens us, because instinctively we know that this will lead us to a change, a complete change in our lives. If we accept being renewed and cleansed by the Wind, we will have to face without compromise the teachings of the Gospel. We will hear the healing, yet demanding, words of God that allow no compromise and give no place to hide.

    We will begin to understand that our faith is a love affair between God, who loved us first, and ourselves, whom he asks to love him back. We will realize that we must face the fact, the inescapable fact—with all its tremendous communal, national, and international implications—that we are “our brother’s keeper”. We will need to cleanse our hearts of idolatry, for we worship many things, many idols, like status, comfort, power and wealth. The Holy Spirit comes as Fire and Wind to cleanse the heart so there is no impediment for God to pass through.

    St. Paul says, “One Spirit was given to us all to drink” (1 Cor 12:13). The Spirit fills us with that drink from which no one thirsts, if we allow him to cleanse our soul and mind and heart. I am filled to the brim; then, that which I drink I must give to others. I have become a fountain, for I have drunk the Lord and now anyone can drink of me.

    In the Resurrection account in the Gospel of John (20: 19, 21) we read:
    In the evening of that same day, the first day of the week, the doors were closed in the room where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews. Jesus came and stood amongst them. He said to them…“Peace be with you! As the Father sent me, so I am sending you.”

    Here Christ says something fantastic: “As the Father sent me, so I am sending you.” He said it to the apostles, but what he says is meant for you and me. “As my Father sends me, so I am sending you.” To do what? To preach the Good News. The Good News is the incarnation, life, crucifixion, resurrection of Jesus Christ, and the affirmation of the new covenant: Love your God with your whole heart, your whole mind, your whole soul; and love your neighbor as yourself. He also said, “By this you shall be known as my disciples: that you love one another as I have loved you”. Therefore, “As my Father sent me, so I am sending you. Show them that you are my disciples. Love one another as I have loved you”.

    Whether we are rich or poor, learned or unlearned, there are many services to be done. Even those who are sick or incapacitated in some way show the features of Christ; there is a “usefulness to uselessness”. After all, the most useful hours that Christ spent on this earth were on the cross, though they seem utterly useless from our pragmatic point of view.

    The Holy Spirit “makes all things new” (cf, Rev 21:5). We co-operate by opening ourselves, each one of us individually, to this fire of his that will make us “new.” What does it mean to open oneself to the Spirit? It means to allow ourselves to fall completely and utterly into the hands of God. It is said, “It is a terrible thing to fall into the hands of the living God!” So it is, if we read the Scriptures attentively with an open heart and an open mind, and ponder over the love of those who opened themselves totally to God—like the prophets of old, like John the Baptist, like the apostles after the first Pentecost; like Mary, the Mother of God with her ‘Fiat’ (“Let it be done to me as you have said,” Lk 1:38)—her tremendous, constantly renewed Fiat; like the martyrs and saints.
    In John’s Gospel the resurrected Jesus breathed on his apostles and said: “Receive the Holy Spirit…” (Jn 20: 22-23). The breath of God is ours, too; he breathed on his apostles, but all of us are breathed upon in the sacrament of Confirmation. So what does one do with the breath of God?

    If God has us “breathe” him in, then we have to breathe him out, because nothing that God gives us is only for me, myself alone, but is for everybody. Nothing matters except loving one another. Let us risk everything, even our lives, so that we might love one another, so that we might be compassionate to one another. We just cannot sit back, we to whom the grace of God is given, and leave anyone that we come across to be lonely or sad; and let us forgive one another, which is part of loving.

    Adapted from Season of Mercy by Catherine Doherty.

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    Cooperating with the graces of Pentecost

    On Pentecost day, God’s mercy and love came in the form of a powerful wind and in the shape of tongues of fire, and hovered over the heads of his apostles, filling them with unending joy and the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Who is this Holy Spirit? The Advocate, the Consoler, the Enlightener, the Gift and Virtue Giver, the Father of the Poor, the third Person of the Most Holy Trinity.

    In the life of a Christian, every day is a Pentecost. We have been baptized in water and the Holy Spirit. At our Confirmation, the fire of the Holy Spirit acted on each of us in an invisible way. Every day the mighty Wind comes, if only we call upon him. Every day the tongues of flame descend upon us, if we realize our need for them and desire them with a great desire. In each one of us, at all times, the Fire and the Wind are with us, but we tend to forget this as we grow older. We let things ride. Let us lift our hearts and minds and remember that the breath of the Spirit and his fire are upon us.

    God has sent this fire to renew the earth, and this fire does not only come at a certain moment in time. It comes every moment, at all times, so that we can give to others the gifts that we have received. Do we allow ourselves to be caught up in that Wind that makes all things new, that renews the face of the earth? Or are we like ostriches hiding our heads in the sand of old habits, old ways? Stubbornly refusing to be caught by the Wind of the Spirit that tries to sweep us clean so that we show beauty to the world once more?

    It is so easy to hide from the Wind. It is easy to let it pass by without allowing ourselves to be caught up by it. It is easy to stay put, behind closed doors and windows, pleading that winds are drafty, that they may sweep corners of our souls that we have not looked at for many years. It is so easy to plead that we are too set in our ways, too tired to allow ourselves to be “spring-cleaned” by the Wind of the Holy Spirit.

    For the fresh air that the Wind brings demands of us tremendous efforts; it pleads for a re-examination of mind, soul, and heart that frightens us, because instinctively we know that this will lead us to a change, a complete change in our lives. If we accept being renewed and cleansed by the Wind, we will have to face without compromise the teachings of the Gospel. We will hear the healing, yet demanding, words of God that allow no compromise and give no place to hide.

    We will begin to understand that our faith is a love affair between God, who loved us first, and ourselves, whom he asks to love him back. We will realize that we must face the fact, the inescapable fact—with all its tremendous communal, national, and international implications—that we are “our brother’s keeper”. We will need to cleanse our hearts of idolatry, for we worship many things, many idols, like status, comfort, power and wealth. The Holy Spirit comes as Fire and Wind to cleanse the heart so there is no impediment for God to pass through.

    St. Paul says, “One Spirit was given to us all to drink” (1 Cor 12:13). The Spirit fills us with that drink from which no one thirsts, if we allow him to cleanse our soul and mind and heart. I am filled to the brim; then, that which I drink I must give to others. I have become a fountain, for I have drunk the Lord and now anyone can drink of me.

    In the Resurrection account in the Gospel of John (20: 19, 21) we read:
    In the evening of that same day, the first day of the week, the doors were closed in the room where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews. Jesus came and stood amongst them. He said to them…“Peace be with you! As the Father sent me, so I am sending you.”

    Here Christ says something fantastic: “As the Father sent me, so I am sending you.” He said it to the apostles, but what he says is meant for you and me. “As my Father sends me, so I am sending you.” To do what? To preach the Good News. The Good News is the incarnation, life, crucifixion, resurrection of Jesus Christ, and the affirmation of the new covenant: Love your God with your whole heart, your whole mind, your whole soul; and love your neighbor as yourself. He also said, “By this you shall be known as my disciples: that you love one another as I have loved you”. Therefore, “As my Father sent me, so I am sending you. Show them that you are my disciples. Love one another as I have loved you”.

    Whether we are rich or poor, learned or unlearned, there are many services to be done. Even those who are sick or incapacitated in some way show the features of Christ; there is a “usefulness to uselessness”. After all, the most useful hours that Christ spent on this earth were on the cross, though they seem utterly useless from our pragmatic point of view.

    The Holy Spirit “makes all things new” (cf, Rev 21:5). We co-operate by opening ourselves, each one of us individually, to this fire of his that will make us “new.” What does it mean to open oneself to the Spirit? It means to allow ourselves to fall completely and utterly into the hands of God. It is said, “It is a terrible thing to fall into the hands of the living God!” So it is, if we read the Scriptures attentively with an open heart and an open mind, and ponder over the love of those who opened themselves totally to God—like the prophets of old, like John the Baptist, like the apostles after the first Pentecost; like Mary, the Mother of God with her ‘Fiat’ (“Let it be done to me as you have said,” Lk 1:38)—her tremendous, constantly renewed Fiat; like the martyrs and saints.
    In John’s Gospel the resurrected Jesus breathed on his apostles and said: “Receive the Holy Spirit…” (Jn 20: 22-23). The breath of God is ours, too; he breathed on his apostles, but all of us are breathed upon in the sacrament of Confirmation. So what does one do with the breath of God?

    If God has us “breathe” him in, then we have to breathe him out, because nothing that God gives us is only for me, myself alone, but is for everybody. Nothing matters except loving one another. Let us risk everything, even our lives, so that we might love one another, so that we might be compassionate to one another. We just cannot sit back, we to whom the grace of God is given, and leave anyone that we come across to be lonely or sad; and let us forgive one another, which is part of loving.

    Adapted from Season of Mercy by Catherine Doherty.

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    Mary's Faith

    Thursday, May 29, 2014, 9:13 PM [General]

    The Beatitudes rank high on the list of all-time favorite Bible passages.  But what is beatitude, anyway?   In the bible, a “blessed” person is someone who has received gifts of the greatest value, gifts that lead to true fulfillment and lasting happiness.

     

    If I were to ask you to name the first beatitude, you’d probably say “blessed be the poor in Spirit.”  According to Matthew you’d be right, but not according to Luke.  At the very beginning of his gospel, Luke reveals that the very first beatitude is uttered by a woman filled with the Spirit, speaking of another woman overshadowed by the Spirit.  Elizabeth says, “Blessed is she who has believed.” (Luke 1: 45).

     

    Is Marian devotion important in Christian life?  This has been a bone of contention between Catholics and Protestants for nearly 500 years. 

    Mother Mary of God, The First Believer, The Annuciation 

    Let’s look at the evidence in just the first chapter of Luke.  First, the Angel Gabriel honors her with the greeting “Hail, full of grace” (Luke 1:29).  Then Elizabeth prophesies “blessed are you among women.”  Next the prophet John leaps for joy in his mother’s womb at the sound of Mary’s voice.  Then, in her response to Elizabeth, Mary prophesies “all generations will call me blessed” (Lk 1:48).

     

    But it is Elizabeth’s final words to Mary that hold the key to understanding why she is she is to honored, namely, her faith.

     

    One of the battle-cries of the Protestant Reformation was “Faith Alone!”  One key conviction that united the many disparate strands of the Reformation was that it is impossible to earn God’s favor by our good works, but rather we receive his love as a pure gift, a grace, through faith.

     

    Now consider Mary.  Did she criss-cross the Mediterranean planting Churches like Paul?  Did she give eloquent sermons like Stephen (Acts 7).  Did she govern the Church like Peter?  No.  Her claim to fame is that she simply said yes to God.  She believed He could do as he said and would do as He said. 

     

    But true faith is not just intellectual conviction that God exists or that He can do thus and such.  Faith involves entrusting oneself, abandoning oneself to God, willing to submit to his will.  That’s why Paul talks about “the obedience of faith” (Romans 16:26).  She surrendered her plan for her life, and yielded to God’s plan.  And she did this not once, but again and again, even when he left her to begin his public ministry.  And when that ministry led to the horror of Calvary, her faith stood its ground at the foot of the cross.

     

    So Catholics honor Mary for being the perfect example of the greatest Protestant virtue.  Ironic isn’t it?  And the deepest meaning of that disputed doctrine, the Immaculate Conception, is that it was the grace of God working mysteriously from the moment of conception that made possible Mary’s exemplary life of faith.  Even her faith is a gift of His grace.  It’s all grace, according to Catholic doctrine.

     

    Mary Mother of God, The Passion of the Christ, Mel GibsonMary, of course, knew this.  That’s why she responded to Elizabeth’s praise with the humble, exuberant prayer known as the Magnificat: “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior.”  She is like the crystal-clear pool that reflects the suns rays back to the heavens.  So no one needs to fear that honor given her will detract from the majesty of Her divine Son.  She deflects all the praise given her right back to God, the source of her greatness.

     

    So the answer is that Marian devotion is necessary in Christian life.  But what is true devotion to Mary according to the fathers of the Second Vatican Council?  Not sentimental piety or gullible preoccupation with every rumored apparition.  But rather, imitation of her virtues, particularly her faith (Lumen Gentium 67).

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    Parents . happy to be together...

    Tuesday, May 27, 2014, 4:59 AM [General]

    "It is so important for a family to celebrate all together. It is so important for the children to laugh and play and sing with their parents and to see their parents happy to be together.."

    there has been happiness here. There has been much strife .Much healing is needed .And it is said that time heals all things . I don't believe that .We must dig deep and turn to God who knows all about us . 

     A young couple marries with  pie in the sky ideals . They soon realize that the knowlegde they felt would sustain them just didn't hit the mark . After years of struggling to bring peace and harmony to all Jesus spirit brings joy to those who seek him ...

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    "Prince of this world will always stand condemned."

    Monday, May 26, 2014, 6:35 PM [General]

    "Gospel: Jn 16:5–11
    But now I am going to the One who sent me, and none of you asks me where I am going; instead you are overcome with grief, because of what I have said.

    Believe me, it is better for you that I go away, because as long as I do not go away, the Helper will not come to you. But if I go away, I will send him to you, and when he comes, he will vindicate the truth before a sinful world; and he will vindicate the paths of righteousness and justice.

    What is the world’s sin, in regard to me? Disbelief. What is the path of righteousness? It is the path I walk, by which I go to the Father; and you shall see me no more. What is the path of justice? It is the path on which the prince of this world will always stand condemned."


    The time for mentoring is slowly coming to an end. It is not the glory of the Teacher if His pupils remain so. They too must become teachers themselves so that what they have learned from their Master will reach a wider audience. And so Jesus consoles His own with the assurance that the Spirit, the Helper will be sent to them to help them spread the truth of Jesus. They will lose the physical presence of the Lord, but the Spirit will abide forever in their hearts to make them feel that they are never abandoned by the Master who taught and prepared them to continue the mission once He is gone.

    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    A Prayer For Rulers

    Monday, May 26, 2014, 6:57 AM [General]

    Wisdom from John XXIII

    quote

    A Prayer for Rulers: Therefore We pray God that [national] rulers may carefully weigh and consider the causes of dissension and endeavor in good faith to remove them. They must, above all, realize that war (God keep it from us!) can have only one result, vast ruins everywhere, and thus cannot be the object of anyone's reliance. They must adapt to the needs of men of today the laws which regulate the state and society and which bind together nations and classes of society. They must be mindful of the eternal laws which come from God and are the bases and pivots of all government. Finally, they must be ever aware that the individual souls of men are created by God and destined to possess and enjoy Him."

    3.7 (1 Ratings)

    Intimate union, God's gift to mystics

    Saturday, May 24, 2014, 10:37 PM [General]

    Intimate union, God's gift to mystics, is a reminder to all of us of the eternal happiness of union he wishes to give us. The cause of mystical ecstasy in this life is the Holy Spirit, working through spiritual gifts. The ecstasy occurs because of the weakness of the body and its powers to withstand the divine illumination, but as the body is purified and strengthened, ecstasy no longer occurs. On various aspects of ecstasy, see Teresa of Avila, Interior Castle, Chapter 5, and John of the Cross, Dark Night of the Soul, 2:1-2.


    There are many people today who see no purpose in suffering. Mary Magdalene de' Pazzi discovered saving grace in suffering. When she entered religious life she was filled with a desire to suffer for Christ during the rest of her life. The more she suffered, the greater grew her desire for it. Her dying words to her fellow sisters were: "The last thing I ask of you—and I ask it in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ—is that you love him alone, that you trust implicitly in him and that you encourage one another continually to suffer for the love of him."
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    The Holy Spirit

    Friday, May 23, 2014, 11:51 AM [General]

    He wore steel rimmed glasses and had hair to the middle of his back.  The fringe on his buck-skinned jacket bounced as he walked.

     

    At least that was the way I was accustomed to seeing Mike as he bopped around town.  It was just a few years after Woodstock, and we were all taken with hippie culture.  It seemed so free, so new, so exciting.

     

    But that day at the entrance of the mall, I scarcely recognized him.  His hair was cut and his clothing conventional.  He was passing out tracts and spoke to me of the Holy Spirit.  I scratched my head and vaguely remembered some talk about the Holy Spirit in confirmation class.   But I had to admit that I really did not know much about this third person of the Blessed Trinity.

     

    Holy Spirit, Paraclete, Confirmation, Gifts of the Holy SpiritThis is quite common among Christians.  God the Father–we can get a glimpse of his tenderness and strength, thanks to Michelangelo’s magnificent Sistine ceiling.  And baby Jesus in the manger, the savior hanging on the Cross–these are images we can easily visualize.  But Holy Spirit, Holy Ghost?  Somehow, we can’t feel quite the same way about a dove as we do about a child on its mother’s lap.  And then what does this “Spirit” do?  The Father creates, the Son saves, but the Spirit?

     

    Jesus calls him the “Paraclete” as he prepares the disciples for his departure (Jn 14:15-21).  Frankly, this does not help us much–unless, of course, we get a bit of explanation.  This word means “Advocate.”  It is the word for lawyer or attorney in Spanish and other languages.  There may be lots of jokes about lawyers, but when you are in trouble with the law, having a good lawyer is no laughing matter.  That’s the role of the Holy Spirit– He is our defense attorney.

     

    Holy Spirit, Paraclete, Confirmation, John Paul IINow part of the role of the defense attorney is to tell his client how to plead.  Sometimes, when the evidence against you is overwhelming, the sentence will be a whole lot lighter if you just plead guilty.  The Spirit counsels us to be honest, convicting us gently of sin--not to accuse us, not to condemn us, but to help us win our case.  He is the Spirit of Truth.  Pope John Paul II’s theme was “Be not afraid.”   Be not afraid of the truth about your sin, your weakness, and your failings, says the Spirit.  For the judge happens to be the one who loves you so much that he died for you. Your judge is the same one who saved the woman caught in adultery from the rage of the hypocrites.

     

    But he is also the one who told the adulteress to “go and sin no more.”  This is the real problem.  How is she to do that?  Sin was where she looked for life.  It drew her like a magnet.

     

    Drugs, booze and “free-sex” drew my hippie friends like a magnet in the 1970's.  If we were acquitted by the Judge through the counsel of the Advocate, how were we to resist the allure of sin?

     

    Holy Spirit Paraclete, ConfrimationArchbishop Fulton Sheen once said that the only way to dislodge sin from one’s life is through the expulsive force of a new love.  This is the role of the Advocate.  He is the Love of God who is poured into our hearts (Ro 5:5) who drives out unlovely loves.  He is the Lord and Giver of true life who makes utterly clear that so many other things that we regarded as “life” are really death warmed over.

     

    Once you have a taste of the real thing, you are never again satisfied with imitations.  That’s why Mike abandoned the drug scene.  That’s why the Magdalene and the Samaritan woman abandoned all other lovers.  That’s why the rejoicing in Samaria rose to fever pitch (Acts 8:8).

     

    The Holy Spirit is the real thing.  And he does not just come and go.  He is with us always.

     


    (In my inbox this AM

     

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    Important questions

    Thursday, May 22, 2014, 10:04 PM [General]

    For the Baptism of adults and for all the baptized at the Easter Vigil, three questions are asked: “Do you reject sin so as to live in the freedom of God's children? Do you reject the glamor of evil, and refuse to be mastered by sin? Do you reject Satan, father of sin and prince of darkness?”

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    John 14:1-12?

    Sunday, May 18, 2014, 4:40 AM [General]

    the Way, the Truth, and the Life -- What does Jesus Christ mean when he says this John 14:1-12? 

     

    “As long as you believe in God and try to be a good person, your religion doesn’t matter.”  “There are different paths up the same mountain, but they all lead to the peak.”

     

    How many times have you heard people speak this way?  This is the prevailing wisdom.  It’s politically correct.  Tolerant.  Reasonable.

     

    But it’s wrong.  Jesus has the nerve to say “I am the way, the truth and the life.  No one comes to the Father but by me.”

     

    The highway to heaven had been closed for centuries.  God did not set up the road block.  We did.  But the barriers that we erected were immovable.  At least by us.  God was the only one who could open the way.

     

    There was a problem with truth and life as well.  Sure, people had some ideas about God.  But the ideas were shadowy, fragmentary and mingled with distortions.  Everyone in the ancient world knew there was a Creator we were obliged to worship.  But some thought homage required human sacrifice.  And most thought that there were many gods.  A few, like Aristotle, realized that there could only be one God.  But he imagined this God to be remote and aloof, unconcerned with human affairs.

     

    David, Catholic Church, The Way, The Truth and Life

    Finally there was the issue of life, divine life.  Even the Jews, who had the most truth about God, had a problem here. They knew what God required.  But even the best among them lacked the power to do it.  Take David for instance.  When the chips were down, he proved defenseless against the power of lust, deceit, and even murder.

     

    Jesus is the way.  Indeed he is a two way street.  In him, God comes to meet us, holding nothing back, offering everything of who he is and what he has.  Through Him and Him alone, we have access to God to such a point that we can now call him Abba, Father. 

     

    Jesus is the truth.  Not just some truth but the entire truth.  He is God’s definitive and perfect Word expressing who God is, what He’s like, who we are, and what we need to do to be saved from misery and futility. 

     

    And Jesus is the life.  He gives us not only commandments and noble ideals, but also the power to live them out, the power to become new people.  That Power is the Lord and Giver of Life Himself, the Holy Spirit, who Jesus pours out on those who accept Him.

     

    So there is only one Way, one Truth, one Life, and one Priest who offers a perfect sacrifice for sins. So how can it be that we are called a royal priesthood (I Peter 2)?  How can it be that we who believe in Him are to do greater works than he? (John 14:11-12)

     

    Pope Benedict XVI, Ratzinger

    Simple.  Once we’ve been baptized, there is no longer a separation between us, on the one hand, and Him on the other.  We are baptized into him, become members of his body, so he begins to live his life and exercise his priesthood through us. 

     

    If we let him, he will use our lips to spread his truth, our lives to show the way, and our love to give others life.  And the works He will accomplish through us will far surpass what he did in his three short years of public ministry.  More hungry will be fed, more sick healed, more books written.  Tyrannical, atheistic empires will even be brought down.  The Good News will be preached not just in Galilee, but all over the world, not just in person, but touching millions at a time . . .  through radio, TV, and internet.

     

    But the greatest work that He will accomplish through us is to teach us to be priests, to offer the spiritual sacrifice of our own lives (Romans 12:2) to the Father through Him, with Him, and in Him.  For the meaning of human life is to love, and the greatest gift we’ve received from Him is the power to give ourselves away.

     

    a reflection on Acts 6:1-7; Ps 33;  I

     

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    This Beautiful hardcover Family Bible is the first ever publication of The Holy Bible in a Divine Mercy Edition, the Revised Standard Version, Catholic Edition. This beautiful Bible is a keepsake for your family and makes an amazing gift! There are amazing sections of the Rosary and Station of the Cross, 48 page full color section on the Life of Christ, “Pilgrimage in pictures” to shrines and the Holy Land – study aids and so much more to bless your family.


    Meditations for Mothers
    Meditations for Mothers - NEW!This small easy-to-ready to read book taken from the phenomenal bestseller The Better Part brings together Gospel passages, commentaries, and jewels from our spiritual and cultural heritage, making it perfect for personal study, discussion groups, or simply discussing with a friend over a hot cup of coffee. Full color with beautiful layout throughout.

     

     


    Guide to the Divine Mercy
     Guide to the Divine Mercy This revised edition takes you on a tour of Divine Mercy throughout salvation history, through the Old and New Testaments, in the writings of the Church's great theologians, and in the lives and writings of the saints down through the ages. In this revised edition, Dr. Stackpole expands his chapter on the great theologian St. Augustine, includes a new chapter on the spiritual master St. Bernard of Clairvaux, and highlights the involvement of Pope Benedict XVI at the first World Apostolic Congress on Mercy in 2008

     

     

     

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