Secular Parable & Aphorism of the Week

    Monday, May 12, 2014, 12:58 AM [General]
    Posted By: Frank Burton

    Aphorism of the Week

    Rather than preach the right answer, ask the right question.

    Dedicated in admonishment of the Supreme Court's acceptance of government-public meetings being allowed to proclaim and practice the "majority"-approved expression of religious belief and worship. When the majority of the public someday changes to a belief different from that of the Court, will the Court retain this logic? And can any government long proclaim a religion, without soon working to establish it?

    Parable of the Week

    The Evil, The Good
    She sought the source of Evil and Good.
    The Seeker traveled to houses of religion, and asked the pastors, priests, rabbis and imams, "What is the source of Evil and Good?" They replied, "Evil stems from not believing in our God, and Good from believing in Him."
    The Seeker traveled to lawmakers and dictators, and asked them, "What is the source of Evil and Good?" They replied, "Evil stems from not obeying our laws, and Good from obeying them."
    The Seeker traveled to communes, and asked those gathered there, "What is the source of Evil and Good?" They replied, "Evil stems from property and greed, while Good stems from sharing and self-sacrifice."
    The Seeker traveled to gated communities, and asked their owners, "What is the source of Evil and Good?" They replied, "Evil stems from sharing and self-sacrifice, while Good stems from property and greed."
    The Seeker grew confused, and wandered for days into the countryside. She squatted by the side of a dirt road, and told herself, "I will accept the opinion of the very next person to walk by!"
    She looked up the road and saw, emerging from the thrumming waves of heat and cricket song, a gnarled old man in a dusty straw hat, shuffling with a cane. As he passed near, she plucked at his sleeve.
    "Old man! Please tell me! What is the source of Evil and Good?!"
    In the silence of the crickets' stillness, the old man stopped and looked at her face, his squinty eyes as impenetrable as dark trenches in the earth. His mouth broke into a harmonica-like grin. "The source of Evil...and Good? If you ask me...think for yourself!"
    "But you didn't answer my question," the Seeker lamented.
    "Oh, I did, young one. I did!" said the old man, who winked as he walked away.
    Thus, Evil is the unreasoning, Good the reasoning.

    May 10, 2014, excerpt from The Parables of Reason © 2007-2014 (Chapter 3, "Emotion's Mastery"), by Frank H. Burton, Executive Director, The Circle of Reason.

    0 (0 Ratings)

    Secular Parable & Aphorism of the Week

    Sunday, May 4, 2014, 7:51 PM [General]
    Posted By: Frank Burton

    Aphorism of the Week

    Herding is not the same as leading.

    Dedicated in admonishment of Boko Haram's acts of murdering and raping students, terrorism, and other human rights violations, all in the name of religious fundamentalism (acts which would be called "medieval" except for the fact that Muslim society and education was the most advanced in the world during the actual Medieval era); and in admonishment of the failure of Nigeria's leaders to create a bulwark against Boko Haram recruitment, through providing educational and economic reforms to improve the lives of its rural citizenry.

    Parable of the Week

    The Way of Taqlid, The Way of 'Aql
    Proudly the tribe reigned over deserts white with sand and spotted with black pools of oil.
    Although war had been thrust upon them since the grey dawn of history, until peace was a fleeting memory, among their number had lived mathematicians, astronomers, scientists and librarians -- who had saved the foundations of the Edifice of Man.
    Yet, when Man learned to transmute the black oil into gold, and when the hearts of many claimed the garden from which all men arose, the land and the tribe were torn with strife 'ere unseen.
    Two youths lived in that place and that time.
    The first youth grew to hate all who, long before, had oppressed and driven out his people. Hearing the cries of zealous religious scholars for jihad, one sunrise after prayers he said to himself, "I will do as my scholars preach, for surely they know best, while I know so little."
    Imitating so many before him, he strapped on a bomb and blew himself up inside a schoolyard, killing the children of his enemy.
    Following the way of Taqlid to his murderous death, his face, in its last moment, was sadly alight with expectation.
    The second youth also grew to hate his people's lot, yet saw the children of his oppressors in a different light -- as people like him, trapped by both circumstance and belief.
    Whenever hatred and the call to jihad surged in his breast, he recalled the terror in the faces of not only their tribe's children but of the children of their enemy, and his struggle turned inward. He, too, prayed to Allah, but said to himself, "As the Prophet used the way of 'Aql -- of intellect and mind -- to restore our tribes to faith, so too must my shoulders carry the weight of interpreting his teachings; I must use my own intellect and mind."
    "And my ijtihad, my inner struggle, tells me that murdering others is not the way to paradise, either here on earth or in the heavenly presence of Allah."
    So did the second youth start a madrassa, which he named The Lifting of The Black Stone, to teach ways of peaceful cooperation and non-violent resistance taught by Abraham, Moses, Buddha, Confucius, Jesus, Muhammad, Sumayya, Bahá'u'lláh, Gandhi, King, Milk, Romero, Mandela, and Suu Kyi.
    And his madrassa gradually restored to his people their once and future path of logic and questioning -- the only way to transform enemy into ally; the way of war through peace.
    Thus, the true jihad is ijtihad. -- via Irshad Manji

    May 3, 2014, excerpt from The Parables of Reason © 2007-2014 (Chapter 2, "Assumption's Denial"), by Frank H. Burton, Executive Director, The Circle of Reason.

    0 (0 Ratings)

    Secular Parable & Aphorism of the Week

    Sunday, April 27, 2014, 6:48 PM [General]
    Posted By: Frank Burton

    Aphorism of the Week

    The handmaiden of faith must be doubt.

    Dedicated to the bipartisan effort of Minnesota state GOP and DFL legislators to end firearm ownership by legally-convicted stalkers or domestic abusers, and to disallow firearm possession for people under temporary restraining orders for alleged abuse; and to the law's spearheading by two ex-"street-cop" Legislators, one Republican and one Democrat: Rep. Dan Schoen and Rep. Tony Cornish. Also dedicated in supplication to the NRA, that they consider following the lead of the Gun Owners Civil Rights Alliance, which dropped its initial objection to the bill and agreed with the principle of "making sure the guns get out of the house" of domestic abusers.

    Parable of the Week

    The Engine, The Driver
    Three race cars sat on the track.
    The first race car was but a shell on wheels, its engine removed. The driver pushed the eviscerated car to the starting line, hopped into the seat, grabbed the wheel -- and bobbed back and forth behind the steering column like a wind-up toy. The eviscerated shell of the racer rocked gently on the asphalt.
    The second race car was a Formula One racer, with a massive engine -- but no driver. The racer idled in neutral, its throbbing engine powerless to budge it even one inch.
    The last race car was a small convertible with a four-cylinder engine, but a capable driver. As the green flag fell, he gunned his engine, shifted into first, and leapt down the racetrack, rubber burning behind him on the road.
    In seconds he was gone -- riding a cloud of white, beyond the far turn.
    Thus, emotion is our engine - but we must remain the driver.

    April 26, 2014, excerpt from The Parables of Reason © 2007-2014 (Chapter 3, "Emotion's Mastery"), by Frank H. Burton, Executive Director, The Circle of Reason.

    0 (0 Ratings)

    Secular Parables & Aphorisms of the Week

    Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 6:10 PM [General]
    Posted By: Frank Burton

    Aphorism of the Week :

    Moral evil is abrogating the right of others to think for themselves. -- via Lindsay Tornambe

    Dedicated to Lindsay Tornambe's and "C's" escape from the Finlayson, Minnesota, religious and child sexual abuse cult that trapped their families; and to Ms. Tornambe's realization that their escape wasn't simply from a religion, but from what traps many people regardless of their worldviews -- a moral evil she herself identified: "We didn't really have a chance to think for ourselves."

    Parable of the Week :

    The Blue Ceiling, The Blue Sky
    Grey clouds ushered the new employee into the bank.
    His boss welcomed him, saying, "Innovate and you'll get ahead in the world!"
    "The sky's the limit!" he exclaimed.
    Saying this, the boss gestured up -- at the vaulted, white cloud-painted blue dome above the main lobby.
    The employee wracked his brain for weeks to come up with an idea to save the bank money. But when he presented his idea to his coworkers and boss, they frowned and told him that the idea was unworkable.
    And that he was a show-off.
    He grew sullen, as his best ideas were ignored while the same poor planning that had kept the bank small was all that was permitted.
    On his last day at the job, after packing his personal belongings, he overheard the boss tell a young, new worker, "The sky's the limit!"
    While the bank guard, dressed in grey, ushered him out the door, cardboard box under one arm, he passed the new guy --who was staring up at the cloud-painted vaulted dome.
    He paused and whispered in the new guy's ear.
    "It's a ceiling."
    Then he walked out into a true blue day.
    Thus, make sure your blue sky isn't a blue ceiling.

    April 19, 2014, excerpt from The Parables of Reason © 2007-2014 (Chapter2, "Assumption's Denial"), by Frank H. Burton, Executive Director, The Circle of Reason

    -----

    Aphorism of the Week:

    If you justify violence as the will of Allah, you're remaking Allah in your own image.

    Dedicated in admonishment of the aggression and terrorism by Boko Haram. Initiation of violence, and the subsequent undercutting of others' ability to use Reason, is not and can never be a moral political tactic.

    Parable of the Week :

    The Totalitarian, The Free
    Twin countries nestled against each other in the womb.
    The first country, at the insistence of its army, installed a charismatic dictator.
    Garbed in green fatigues, he told the people what kind of work they must do, and who would benefit from it.
    He was overthrown and replaced by another dictator, who, regaled in satin robes, told them what kind of belief they must have.
    He, too, was overthrown, and replaced by yet a third dictator, who, cloaked in a white hood, told them what kind of color people they must marry.
    The country teetered like a refugee dragged on his final, long march.
    And in the dark of night, fearing the knock at their door, never did its people know peace in their beds.
    But the second country, at the insistence of its own charismatic leader, installed a Constitution of individual, religious, racial, social, and environmental rights, protected by a representational government.
    Then the leader hung up his pressed suit and retired to his farm.
    This country did not teeter toward enslavement and persecution of its people for what work they did, what belief they held, or what color they were.
    It grew innovative, strong and free.
    And in the dark of night, fearing no knock at their door, always did its people know peace in their beds.
    Thus, one can be chained in many ways, but it is all one chain -- upon reasoned choice.

    April 12, 2014, excerpt from The Parables of Reason © 2007-2014 (Chapter 2, "Assumption's Denial"), by Frank H. Burton, Executive Director, The Circle of Reason

    -----

    Aphorism of the Week :

    The spoils of war and deception spoil with the light of day.

    Dedicated in admonishment of Russian President Vladimir Putin's undercutting, both by force and propaganda, of the will of the People of Ukraine toward self-determination.

    Parable of the Week :

    The Powerless, The Powerful
    A "right to vote" was enshrined in the Constitution of both neighboring peoples -- but immersed within a tortuous, dark palimpsest of corrupt laws.
    In the first country, public officials, even the Presidency itself, were bought. Incumbency of the largest political parties was guaranteed by television ads -- which, through misdirection, calmed the people's concerns. Power, and immense, ill-gotten riches, were held in the grasp of a very few -- while many were poor, cheated of a day's pay for a day's work, and lived on acrid, despoiled land.
    Its people stayed home and cursed, come voting day.
    The second country, too, had been bought; its people, too, saw the poverty of their hardest workers, tasted acrid air and oily water, and saw the politicians and pundits shun all but the wealthy and a few token poor.
    But its people fought back -- writing editorials, publishing alternative newspapers, talking on public television, and blogging on the Internet.
    And come voting day all of them -- every one of them -- left their homes to vote.
    The people, realizing they had suffered from a mass illusion of powerlessness, never again cursed the government they had themselves permitted all along -- but threw it out and elected true representatives.
    Thus, your vote is absolute power incarnated -- or absolute power abdicated.

    April 5, 2014, excerpt from The Parables of Reason © 2007-2014 (Chapter 2, "Assumption's Denial"), by Frank H. Burton, Executive Director, The Circle of Reason

    -----

    0 (0 Ratings)

    Secular Parable & Aphorism of the Week

    Sunday, March 30, 2014, 7:00 PM [General]
    Posted By: Frank Burton

    Aphorism of the Week

    Strong cloth is woven from many threads.

    Dedicated in admonishment of medically-uninsured young adults of the Millennial Generation who are declining to buy cheap medical insurance by March 31, through the U.S. Affordable Care Act. Taking responsibility for your own healthcare also means not bumming off your fellow citizens' wallets to pay for it after you go bankrupt from unpredicted injury or illness.

    Parable of the Week

    The Riverbank, The Flood
    Fertile delta meandered beneath the feet of two young farmers.
    One bought a farm on the green banks of the river, and profited enormously from its cheap cost.
    The other visited his friend's sprawling farm. Bare feet on green grass, he walked to the banks of the mighty river, pondering its iron, foam-crested turbulence. Then, lacing on his shoes, he hiked south closer to the city, where the river was channeled through the verdant plains by levees and canals -- and there he bought a small farm, where he barely scraped by due to the farm's expense.
    The first farmer chided the second about his expensive, tiny farm.
    But then the rains came unceasingly -- and the mighty, life-giving river swelled in its banks. To no avail the first farmer tried to protect his farm and his family from the torrent of rushing, blue-grey water, as it billowed over the low green banks -- and all was swept away to ruin.
    So did the first farmer come to fear the river and its surges.
    But where the swollen river had been leveed and channeled, the second farmer's land and family remained safe on its banks, and his small farm thrived.
    So did the second farmer come to appreciate the river and its levees.
    Thus, let joy flow, but not flood.

    March 29, 2014, excerpt from The Parables of Reason © 2007-2014 (Chapter 3, "Emotion's Mastery"), by Frank H. Burton, Executive Director, The Circle of Reason.

    -----

    Aphorism of the Week

    We are born fools, and without great effort fools we remain.

    Dedicated in admonishment of President Barack Obama's ad hominem insulting of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Under any circumstances, an insult elicits irrational, emotional responses in its target -- even if the target is a world leader with Syrian and Iranian influence, UN Security Council veto power, exclusive access to the International Space Station, and nuclear weaponry.

    Parable of the Week

    The Barker, The Talker
    None know the fount of the angelic and the feral.
    One man blurted out everything on his mind.
    No matter that among his thoughts, circling like ravens' feathers in his soul, were insults, slanders and blame -- the unwise, the inaccurate, the unnecessary, and the unkind.
    No matter -- all blew out of his head, on the first breeze from his mouth.
    To many, this man seemed more a barking dog than a human being.
    Another man only tithed what was on his mind.
    No matter that among his thoughts, growing like gemstones in his soul, were compliments, accolades and advice.
    No matter -- only the wise, the accurate, the necessary, and the kind were quarried, like veins of opal, from the deep well of his voice.
    To many, this man seemed more an angel than a human being.
    Thus, tithe your thoughts.

    March 22, 2014, excerpt from The Parables of Reason © 2007-2014 (Chapter 3, "Emotion's Mastery"), by Frank H. Burton, Executive Director, The Circle of Reason.

    0 (0 Ratings)

    Page 2 of 11  •  Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 11 Next